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Vermeil: Offensive coaches work better, but leaders work bes

justin klugh philly com

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#1 herbicide

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:21 AM

Klugh

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Vermeil: Offensive coaches work better, but leaders work best

Justin Klugh, Philly.com Staff

Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2013, 5:06 PM


There isn't a clear picture of who the next Eagles coach is going to be, but we can cross D Vermeil's name off the list.

"I could do it for about a month," the former Eagles and Kansas City Chiefs coach said with a laugh.
Vermeil was on 94 WIP on Tuesday to talk about the Eagles' coaching search and the pressure facing both the newcomer in Philadelphia and the predecessor in Kansas City. He explained how, in his opinion, a the responsibilities of a head coach transcend their in-game specialty.

"I think it’s an advantage for an NFL coach to be an offensive coach, he’s gotta answer all the questions anyway and 90% of them are going to be about the offense."

"More often than not, the conversation starts about the QB or the offense. So why not have somebody who's the hood ornament of your organization have that as their strengths. I’m not saying it’s the only way or the right way, I just will always lean that way. But I’ll tell you this, if I could get the right leader and he was a defensive coach and I couldn’t get that in an offensive coach, I would go with the defensive coach."

Andy Reid's departure was bittersweet, but Vermeil noted how Kansas City will be good for him.

"Go take the job, it’s a good one, I told him," he said.

"In coaching, it’s all about the people you’re with and the organization you represent. You can’t find people better than the Hunt family. Yes, Lamar is gone, but I don’t think Clark has fallen too far from the tree…they’re just wonderful people to work for and represent. And the city itself is a wonderful place to work. They love their football every bit as much as the Eagle fans. They’re a little less intense, they’re a little more patient. They’re midwesterners in nature. And I’m not saying that’s better or worse."

Whoever comes into Philly, Vermeil explained, will have a hole to climb out of and not a lot of time to get a grip.

"The expectations are always higher in Philly than they ought to be. I don’t know if any other city starts talking about the playoffs in the preseason. They won so consistently for such a long time, they started to take it for granted."

"Anybody coming in here, he’ll find the expectations very high early, and it will be easy to disappoint the fans if it doesn’t go that way--that’s just our city."

"Nobody can really appreciate winning the Super Bowl if they haven’t lost one. It takes the same thing to get there and lose that it does to get there and win. It’s tough."

"They’re gonna do the right thing, I’m sure."

With waves of paranoia started by the involvement of Eagles GM Howie Roseman--widely considered "not a football guy"--the Birds are entering an era in which trust and control in the coaching staff will be questioned and observed. Vermeil stressed the importance of working as a collective.

"If I’m a real experienced guy, I may want to have the power to surround myself with football people to make the football decisions.  But you know, you work together, it doesn’t matter who makes all the decisions.  You make them together.  I think a program can have a guy in a position of leadership and a coach may think, 'I’m not gonna hang my career on that guy.'  Another way to think is, 'I’ve got all the credentials; I’m gonna coach everybody, including the GM.'"

“It’s not about power, it’s about working together.”

Justin Klugh Philly.com Staff


#2 forevereagles

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 08:31 AM

Why people don't see Roseman as "a football guy" is beyond me. He had the best draft this past draft than any of the previous GM's before him. Yet he is being labeled unjustly because he didn't grow up in a "football" enviorment? Thats like saying a guy can't become a good doctor, because his father or his ancestors weren't doctors.  Thats stupid and biased thinking.

It's about determination to succeed. The desire to be the best at what you do. To put in the efffort and the hours. To educate yourself on the subject at hand of being a sound GM. Roseman has demonstrated he is willing and able to do all those things. Only in Philly ( thanks in part to a biased media) and a brain washed fan base, he his being percieved as  unqualifed, when he has proven just the opposite.

#3 pdmkob

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:49 PM

Vermeil was pushin for Gruden - but he also personally endorsed Herm to take over when he left the chiefs - and well -

#4 The_Talon

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:23 PM

View Postforevereagles, on 09 January 2013 - 08:31 AM, said:

Why people don't see Roseman as "a football guy" is beyond me. He had the best draft this past draft than any of the previous GM's before him. Yet he is being labeled unjustly because he didn't grow up in a "football" enviorment? Thats like saying a guy can't become a good doctor, because his father or his ancestors weren't doctors.  Thats stupid and biased thinking.

It's about determination to succeed. The desire to be the best at what you do. To put in the efffort and the hours. To educate yourself on the subject at hand of being a sound GM. Roseman has demonstrated he is willing and able to do all those things. Only in Philly ( thanks in part to a biased media) and a brain washed fan base, he his being percieved as  unqualifed, when he has proven just the opposite.

I think he's labeled as such because he never played professionally or coached (a lot of GM's didn't). People look at him as another accountant, or businessman. Personally, I agree with you. Let's give the guy a chance. I think he's shown a lot of aptitude thus far. Besides, he has been in the league for over ten years already. He must be doing something right.