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Rolling R-word's (Trademark Pending) updates..

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Thought he said he wasn't going to Arizona this year? Are Cooley and Davis going?

Thomas was working out with Ochocinco. I know that sounds odd but

Chad is one of the hardest working receivers in fooball. I haven't

heard if Cooley will be there, but Fred Davis said he will attend along

with Darrelle Revis of the New York Jets.

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McNabb is used to carrying offenses but as we all know, McNabb needs help and can't do it by himself especially as he gets older. Other guys need to step up. He needs a running game, he needs recievers, he needs a defense. With the Eagles for years he had Westbrook and often a solid defense thanks to JJ. All three areas are arguably much worse than what he had last year. He is also in a new offense, on a team that knows more about losing than winning as of late, a coach who has struggled to find alot of success since Elway retired and the most important thing, zero depth at many positions and the oldest team in the entire NFL.

It's also interesting to note that in the ten years after Elway was gone, the Broncos had only four seasons of 20 or more td passes HOWEVER in those four seasons they averaged 14+ ints. McNabb is a QB who averages around 20-22td passes but that could decline depending on if any of his recievers decide step up, which they didn't do last year. Shanny also almost always had young, fresh running backs and one of the best offense lines in the NFL. He always had an elite WR for his QB. The 2010 Skins have arguably the worst o-line, running backs and recievers Shanny has ever coached but the best QB since Elway.

McNabb no doubt lights a fire under this team and could improve them but again, he can't do everything. McNabb automatically doesn't make them a playoff contender. Other players need to step up and that's where I question this team. McNabb is pretty much back to where he was a few years ago with the Eagles. How soon before he's asking for more playmakers in DC? I still have a feeling T.O. ends up with the Skins.

I actually think their line will be decent, (not good, but passable) this season. They are relying on a rookie, but they nabbed a pretty darn good tackle in Jammal Brown, and Artis Hicks is a decent(passable) option at guard. Their defense has actually been pretty good recently, I believe it will be better than ours, unless the switch to 3-4 is too rapid. I think they are playoff contenders. They gave up on Zorn last year, I thought Shannahan was enough to get them 6-7 wins, and I think Donovan is enough to add a couple wins as well. Whether or not 9-7 is enough to get them into the playoffs, I'm not sure, but I certainly see it as a possibility. TO wouldn't surprise me, it would be a weird site to see though.

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I actually think their line will be decent, (not good, but passable) this season. They are relying on a rookie, but they nabbed a pretty darn good tackle in Jammal Brown, and Artis Hicks is a decent(passable) option at guard. Their defense has actually been pretty good recently, I believe it will be better than ours, unless the switch to 3-4 is too rapid. I think they are playoff contenders. They gave up on Zorn last year, I thought Shannahan was enough to get them 6-7 wins, and I think Donovan is enough to add a couple wins as well. Whether or not 9-7 is enough to get them into the playoffs, I'm not sure, but I certainly see it as a possibility. TO wouldn't surprise me, it would be a weird site to see though.

Shanahan has made it clear that the Skins WILL NOT be signing TO.

I for one wouldn't mind seeing it happen.

he 55 REC and 5 TD last season with like 3 different QB's. All of the scrubs.

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Sunday, July 18, 2010, 10:14 PM

By Rich Tandler

Redskins Blogger

CSNwashington.com

The Washington Redskins have had one of the better defenses in the league for most of the past six seasons. When Mike Shanahan and Jim Haslett arrived, they decided that pretty good wasn’t good enough. They are switching the base alignment from a 4-3 base to a 3-4 alignment. There is much more involved with that than just having one lineman stand up and move back a few feet, and it is the subject of this week’s edition of Point-Counterpoint.

Point: What happened to "if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”? This team has been ranked in the top 10 defensively for five of the past six years. Haslett has coached the 4-3; he could just tweak the current setup. Why not just try to build on the success of one of the strengths of the team instead of throwing out the baby with the bath water?

Counterpoint: Yards allowed, which is what those top-10 numbers are based on, don’t tell the whole story of the defense. In fact, that statistic fits in with Mark Twain’s "lies and damned lies”. The Redskins have not been a feared defense, and one of the reasons why is that they don’t generate turnovers. Their turnover ranking in the six years that they’ve had all of those "top 10” defenses from 2004-2009 are as follows: 22nd, 15th, 32nd, 25th, 28th, and 32nd. In 2009, the teams that had the better turnover ratio in a game won 78 percent of the time. The 3-4 is designed to create pressure from different and unexpected places, forcing more turnovers in the process. If the Redskins allow a few more yards per game (and that’s not a given—five of the top seven defenses last year in terms of yardage were 3-4 teams), and get an additional takeaway every week, they will be much better off. The Redskins went the entire two-year Jim Zorn era without scoring a single defensive touchdown. You can’t stand pat and live with such a glaring deficiency.

Point: The 3-4 is a growing trend in the NFL. In 2004, just five teams ran it. In 2008 there were ten 3-4 teams. This year 15 teams, nearly half of the league, will be 3-4 teams. It would be one thing if a few rogue teams were running it. But the collective wisdom of the NFL is moving in the direction of the 3-4.

Counterpoint: In the 1990’s, we looked at teams using the run-and-shoot offense on Astroturf and we thought we were seeing the future of the game. There is a fine line between something being a trend and being a gimmick. Nothing says that the 3-4 also might end up in the dustbin of NFL history. It’s not a new idea. Bud Wilkinson invented the 3-4 back in the 1940’s. If it was such a great idea, why has it taken almost 70 years for it to catch on? And the fact that so many teams are using it now will reduce its effectiveness. As offensive coordinators see it more and more often, they will devise counter-strategies, and the 3-4 will be just another defense. It still comes down to talent.

Point: As noted above, the switch to the 3-4 is more than just having one player assume a two-point stance. The defense demands entirely different skill sets than does the 4-3. Whether you like Albert Haynesworth or not, he can be one of the game’s most dominant players in the proper defensive alignment. The 3-4 is not that alignment. The D-line in the 3-4 is supposed to occupy blockers and let the linebackers make the plays. It’s a waste of $100 million to put Haynesworth in a position where he’s not a playmaker. On top of that, the Redskins will be trying to slap together a group of outside linebackers out of players who have spent virtually their entire football careers lining up with a hand in the dirt. They may be able to rush the passer, but what about coverage?

Counterpoint: Albert will be fine if he gets his head on right and decides to play and earn his paycheck (and that’s the subject of another Point-Counterpoint). His trainer reports that he has slimmed down to 330 pounds, an ideal weight for a 3-4 end. He’ll be able to make plays from the end position just as well as he could at 4-3 tackle. And even if Haynesworth does lose some effectiveness, Brian Orakpo will more than compensate. This defense caters to his strengths as a strong, speed-rushing defender, and he will be a force. Sure, there are concerns about Andre Carter playing at the other linebacker spot, and there are other adjustments that will need to be made. But it isn’t rocket science; you line up and wreak havoc on the opposing offense. They will give up some big plays, but they should make a lot of game-changing plays as well.

Point: This undertaking might make more sense if the team was on a youth movement. But the average starter is just short of 30 years old. The quarterback is 33, the prime running backs are all high-mileage, the best receiver is 31, and there are numerous other players who are on the downside of their careers. They had to change the offense, which hasn’t been highly productive since 1999. But why go through the process of trying to teach the rest of the old dogs new tricks?

Counterpoint: This isn’t necessarily a long-term process. Last year’s Packers are a perfect example of how quickly a team can adapt to the 3-4. In 2008, they were 22nd in yardage allowed, and after switching from the 4-3 they improved to second in that category. They went from 22nd in points allowed to seventh, from 12th in takeaways to first and from 26th against the run to first. And, most importantly, their record improved from 6-10 to 11-5. And they did this with only two new starters on defense. Now, as they say in commercials, your results may vary. But there is no reason to think that going to the 3-4 is a change that won’t bear fruit until 2012.

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Sunday, July 18, 2010, 10:14 PM

By Rich Tandler

Redskins Blogger

CSNwashington.com

The Washington Redskins have had one of the better defenses in the league for most of the past six seasons.

If it aint broke don't fix it? The Skins defense was 18th last year.

On Redskins Live last night they talked about the defense concerns (labeled Landry pretty much a bust and hasn't lived up to his full potential). They also mentioned how the defense hasn't scored a td since 2007 and they were like 26th in turnovers last year. Oh and they also made it a point to talk about o-line concerns especially with Williams now out and the line being injury prone/older.

2009:

Overrall - 18th

PPG - 18th

Passing - 9th

Rushing - 16th

INT - 26th

Forced Fumbles - 13th

Defensive TD - 32nd

Tackles - 15th

Sacks - 5th

Yards Lost - 10th

2008:

Overrall - 4th

PPG - 6th

Passing - 7th

Rushing - 8th

INT - 20th

Forced Fumbles - 26th

Defensive TD - 32nd

Tackles - 30th

Sacks - 20th

Yards Lost - 27th

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"If it was such a great idea, why has it taken almost 70 years for it to catch on? And the fact that so many teams are using it now will reduce its effectiveness. As offensive coordinators see it more and more often, they will devise counter-strategies, and the 3-4 will be just another defense. It still comes down to talent"

The 3/4 D comes and goes, in the 70's and 80's a lot of teams ran it.

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Landry is really confusing. He played almost lights out his rookie year and i thought we had a young star safety for sure...but hes regressed every year since. Moving back to strong safety can only be a good thing for him though. If he doesn't rebound this year i bet he will wont be around in 2011.

And by the way, the 2009 skins defense was the worst they have played in like 5 years. They couldnt stop the run and were burned way too many times on deep balls. And again, hardly any big plays from them.

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Landry is really confusing. He played almost lights out his rookie year and i thought we had a young star safety for sure...but hes regressed every year since. Moving back to strong safety can only be a good thing for him though. If he doesn't rebound this year i bet he will wont be around in 2011.

And by the way, the 2009 skins defense was the worst they have played in like 5 years. They couldnt stop the run and were burned way too many times on deep balls. And again, hardly any big plays from them.

+ not getting much help from the offense

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Landry is really confusing. He played almost lights out his rookie year and i thought we had a young star safety for sure...but hes regressed every year since. Moving back to strong safety can only be a good thing for him though. If he doesn't rebound this year i bet he will wont be around in 2011.

And by the way, the 2009 skins defense was the worst they have played in like 5 years. They couldnt stop the run and were burned way too many times on deep balls. And again, hardly any big plays from them.

That's why fans can't expect McNabb to come in and automatically make this team better all by himself. The Skins did very little else in the offseason to upgrade at any other position. The line still has problems, defense has problems, running game has problems, recievers has problems. The biggest thing will be chemistry, something the Skins are not know to have because of all the veterns they bring in with their egos. McNabb has his teammates excited but they also need to step up and do their job too. That's why Campbell wasn't the one to blame last year. He greatly improved while the entire team around him declined. There are still alot of guys on that team responsible for the 4 win season.

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Point: The 3-4 is a growing trend in the NFL. In 2004, just five teams ran it. In 2008 there were ten 3-4 teams. This year 15 teams, nearly half of the league, will be 3-4 teams. It would be one thing if a few rogue teams were running it. But the collective wisdom of the NFL is moving in the direction of the 3-4.

Counterpoint: In the 1990’s, we looked at teams using the run-and-shoot offense on Astroturf and we thought we were seeing the future of the game. There is a fine line between something being a trend and being a gimmick. Nothing says that the 3-4 also might end up in the dustbin of NFL history. It’s not a new idea. Bud Wilkinson invented the 3-4 back in the 1940’s. If it was such a great idea, why has it taken almost 70 years for it to catch on? And the fact that so many teams are using it now will reduce its effectiveness. As offensive coordinators see it more and more often, they will devise counter-strategies, and the 3-4 will be just another defense. It still comes down to talent.

this guy shows no understanding of defensive philosophies or the Off/Def arms race.

this whole article was for the USA Today crowd, not the whisky & cigar crowd at the back of the bar. next time just interview your mom.

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Calvin Johnson is like a huge Djax. The guy is a freak so yeah he is better. I'm sure one of those coaches polls will come out again soon though and Ill make a gentlemens bet with ya that hes listed in the top ten.

ok then, do you think any GM in their right mind would take D.Jackson over lets say Calvin Johnson?

i think not. so again even with the names you crossed off, Jackson is STILL not in the top ten.

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"If it was such a great idea, why has it taken almost 70 years for it to catch on? And the fact that so many teams are using it now will reduce its effectiveness. As offensive coordinators see it more and more often, they will devise counter-strategies, and the 3-4 will be just another defense. It still comes down to talent"

The 3/4 D comes and goes, in the 70's and 80's a lot of teams ran it.

Exactly.

Don't forget, in the late 80's early 90's, the now 4-3 Giants were a 3-4 team.

We're talking LT era NYG.

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Shanahan on Owens, Haynesworth

video

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d8192...-on-haynesworth

Mike Shanahan took time out from the American Century Celebrity Golf Championship on Thursday in Lake Tahoe to discuss Terrell Owens and Albert Haynesworth -- two high-profile names linked to the Washington Redskins. And the coach didn't mince words on each player's situation.

When asked about the possibility of reuniting Owens with former teammate Donovan McNabb as a Redskin, Shanahan told New York's WFAN-AM (via The Washington Post) that "I made a commitment relative to T.O., that we were not gonna go in that direction."

Shanahan also was asked about Haynesworth, who has lost over 30 pounds as he prepares for the start of training camp -- an interesting development from a player who has been vocal about his unhappiness with the team's switch to a 3-4 defense and has stayed away from offseason activities.

"I talked to Albert about a month after I got the job and sat down with him and I said if he did not want to be part of the Washington Redskins, that I'd let him go," Shanahan told WFAN. "I wouldn't trade him, I'd let him go to another football team. But if he did take the check for $21 million, I expected him to play any position that we thought would be in the best interest of the Washington Redskins, be it nose tackle, defensive end or if we wanted to play him at free safety, but we expected him to come in in great shape and do the things that he's capable of doing.

"And hopefully he does that. He hasn't shown up for minicamp, so guys are gonna be looking at him, to see what type of shape he's in, if he's willing to do the little things the right way. And time will tell. If he is buying in, and he is in great shape, we know what type of talent he is, and we know he can help our football team win."

Shanahan echoed some of those comments during an interview on NFL Network.

Several of Haynesworth's teammates have been outspoken about the lineman's absence from workouts. When Shanahan was asked Thursday if he was concerned about the players' reaction to Haynesworth's return, he said: "You know, I don't even worry about that. I want guys that are gonna come in and work extremely hard, and hopefully Albert does that."

"Does he need to do that with the rest of his teammates? I think he does. I think he's got to come in in great shape. People have to know that he's gonna do what's in the best interests of our organization to help us win. We're gonna play him at a position that we think will help us win, and hopefully he can play at that high level, because he's very talented. And hopefully he makes that commitment when he comes in."

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That's why fans can't expect McNabb to come in and automatically make this team better all by himself. The Skins did very little else in the offseason to upgrade at any other position. The line still has problems, defense has problems, running game has problems, recievers has problems. The biggest thing will be chemistry, something the Skins are not know to have because of all the veterns they bring in with their egos. McNabb has his teammates excited but they also need to step up and do their job too. That's why Campbell wasn't the one to blame last year. He greatly improved while the entire team around him declined. There are still alot of guys on that team responsible for the 4 win season.

What?

Maybe not to your standards but the Skins upgarded many of their weaknesses from last season.

QB - McNabb & Grossman over Campbell, Collins

RB - Johnson is an upgrade over L.Betts.

OL - Adding a young stud like Williams and a former two time pro-bowler is an upgrade. plus adding Hicks who should take the place of an injury prone Randy Thomas. AND the fact that they added a handful of young players for depth and maybe a future starter or two.

DL - Carriker, Green, Kemoeatu, Holliday, Scott all are upgrades from last season + they fit the new system.

LB - Didn't need to upgrade, one of the best groups in the league. added depth'

the only two spots the Skins didn't upgrade was at WR and in the secondary, and well you can't fix everything in one season but a better QB will help the younger wideouts and a better/more aggressive passrush will help the secondary.

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What?

Maybe not to your standards but the Skins upgarded many of their weaknesses from last season.

QB - McNabb & Grossman over Campbell, Collins

RB - Johnson is an upgrade over L.Betts.

OL - Adding a young stud like Williams and a former two time pro-bowler is an upgrade. plus adding Hicks who should take the place of an injury prone Randy Thomas. AND the fact that they added a handful of young players for depth and maybe a future starter or two.

DL - Carriker, Green, Kemoeatu, Holliday, Scott all are upgrades from last season + they fit the new system.

LB - Didn't need to upgrade, one of the best groups in the league. added depth'

the only two spots the Skins didn't upgrade was at WR and in the secondary, and well you can't fix everything in one season but a better QB will help the younger wideouts and a better/more aggressive passrush will help the secondary.

Grossman isnt an upgrade over Campbell or Collins.

Williams was good in college. no way is he a stud in the nfl yet.

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Grossman isnt an upgrade over Campbell or Collins.

Grossman is better than Collins who BTW is yet to land on a team.

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I hope Colt Brennan can beat out grossman for the #2 job. Grossman doesnt give me a lot of confidence.

there are only a handful of backups in the league that gives me confidence..

thats how weak the QB situation around the NFL is.

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By Larry Weisman

Redskins.com

Posted: July 23, 2010

Mike Shanahan, 57, was hired Jan. 6 as the Redskins’ executive vice president and head coach. As head coach of the Denver Broncos from 1995-2008, he guided the club to back-to-back Super Bowl victories following the 1997-98 seasons and compiled a record of 154-103. He spoke with Redskins.com’s Larry Weisman in an exclusive Q&A interview at Redskins Park.

Q: In coming back to coaching after a year off, are you sensing a difference in yourself in terms of your patience or your desire?

A: "When you work for 35 years without any time off, 70-100 hour weeks for 35 years, and then you go through a season when you don’t have any time schedule except yours, that’s quite a difference. I had time to do things I had never been able to do, personally as well as professionally. Professionally, I went to some summer camps and got to see how other people run a camp at the professional level and at the collegiate level. I had not done that since I was in college and when you’re working in the NFL, the other teams aren’t going to let you see what they’re doing. So that was something that was interesting.

"The thing that I had never done before was not have the pressure of getting ready for a game, not worrying about injuries, not doing the weekly routine. I could enjoy the games, study the games -- and what a great game we do have. I watched it as a coach as well as a fan. I’ve got six TVs and some of them you can break up the screen so it was a perfect situation to watch all the games, watch the interviews and follow teams. That was a different perspective.”

Q: Even so, you were still thinking about a return to coaching. What sort of groundwork did you do?

A: "I was able, during that time off, to put a staff together if a job did open and I was interested in that job. I had a three-year contract and didn’t have to go back to work but I wanted to investigate who was out there and which coaches would be available if I had the opportunity to get back in the league. I wanted to be prepared, so I talked to coaches during the year who could potentially be on my staff. For example, Jim Haslett (now the Redskins defensive coordinator). I talked to him at least three times at length about defense and philosophies and had him over to my house.”

Q: Any recreation and relaxation?

A: "You take care of yourself. You get in better shape. You sleep a little bit more. I never thought I could sleep but the reason was I always had something on my mind. When you don’t have as much on your mind, you find you can sleep a little more than you ever thought you could. You can do things for yourself relative to your business and finances, take time to look at it and study it.”

Q: Did you pay particular attention to the Houston Texans and your son Kyle, who was the offensive coordinator for them and is now offensive coordinator here?

A: "Yeah, but I always did that. I got to spend time with Kyle during the summer, talk football, and look at his playbook. I went to a couple of games as a fan, just watching the game unfold. I had not done that, oh, since one time in Denver when I went to see the Air Force Academy against Notre Dame. I had not done that in 25 years in the National Football League because on most Saturdays you are doing things with your family or to get ready for your game. I got to do things that normal people do and that was enjoyable.”

Q: As you thought about a staff, was Kyle always in the plans?

A: "It was really a perfect time because his contract was up. Gary (Kubiak, the Texans coach) gave him an opportunity to sign a multi-year contract and he said, ‘Hey, if my dad does get a job I would like the opportunity go with him.’ Kyle was straight-up with him. This was the right timing, because it’s so hard to find someone you communicate with like we do, that understands your style and your offense. He’s been around since he’s been in eighth grade, he’s been studying it, he’s had the opportunity to call plays and do things on his own and to have a top five offense for a very young football team. So he proved that he could do it and it had nothing to do with me.”

Q: In your first year in Washington, do you view your job as more of an executive than a coach?

A: "I think the people that do that make a big mistake. One thing that you cannot get away from is the football. Even being out for a year, I didn’t feel very comfortable being out for more than a year because I think you lose your edge. You’ve got to keep on top of this game. I didn’t want to stay out very long if the right job came along and this is a perfect fit.”

Q: You had the luxury of longevity in Denver, living in one place. That’s rare for coaches. How different is it to be in a new city?

A: "Moves are hard when you’re young. You’re dealing with school systems, you’re dealing with kids. To me it’s an easy transition because you’re concerned with you and your wife. It’s two people, so it’s not hard. I always look forward to new challenges. Early in my career I was moving every year, every four years. I think that keeps people on top of their game, very aware of not getting spoiled or too comfortable. Just being here, going through the process, is rejuvenating.”

Q: Wives are really the unsung heroes, aren’t they?

A: "Oh, yeah. If you don’t have a great wife in coaching, the marriage won’t last. They raise the family. And you have to make sure that when you are home, it’s quality time.”

Q: What was so appealing about the Redskins?

A: "You have a great history. You have 92,000 people at every game and a history of games being sold out, three world championships, great players and Hall of Fame players who have been here. That’s what separates franchises. That’s something that’s very special about this organization. I do feel that the fans here are educated, they know what’s going on in the division and in the NFL and I’ve been very impressed with the fans so far.”

Q: This town always expects a return to greatness and expects it quickly. Do you have to ask people to dial back their expectations after a 4-12 season and so many changes?

A: "You don’t have to temper that. That’s what you should expect and that’s what the fans should expect. If you don’t have that belief, if you don’t believe and the fans don’t believe, chances are the players aren’t going to believe. To go through a season 8-8 in Denver, I didn’t want to go out, I didn’t want to eat. You’re embarrassed because it’s your name on the football team. You represent the city and the football team and you don’t want to have those tough years.”

Q: You were a Denver assistant when the Redskins beat the Broncos 42-10 in Super Bowl XXII with a 35-point second quarter. Any recollections of a day that must have been painful for you but so joyous for the Redskins?

A: "I kind of forget the second quarter. I just remember it was 10-zip. I’ve been in 10 conference championship games in the AFC and the NFC and that’s what you work for, to get to that level and to separate yourself. You do know when you miss an opportunity like we did against Washington in that Super Bowl but you take your hat off to the Redskins not only for winning but for playing so well in the most meaningful game of the year.”

Q: How are the Redskins going to do this season?

A: "I tell the players that we know who we’re playing and when we’re playing them. Right now, the mindset, ‘What are we going to do today? Let’s get better today.’”

Q: The front office here underwent a shakeup last season that led to Bruce Allen’s hiring as general manager and yours as executive vice president and head coach. Do you have the freedom to operate as you see fit?

A: "When I talked to (owner) Daniel Snyder, he wanted me to run it the way I’ve run it in the past. That’s why I’m here as many hours a day as I am, to take care of the football side. I can’t really speak about the past here because I don’t know what’s been done in the past. I just know he’s letting me do everything I was hoping I could do and that’s the only way I think I can function and function well.”

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camp starts in two days. Starting to get worried about Williams not signing on time...

Remember orakpo missed the 1st day of camp and he was the 13th pick. The rams really screwed the pooch this year by not signing Bradford before the draft. Its all their fault.

Actually i just saw a thread on extremeskins, Trent Williams and the skins are in negotiations right now and theres a pretty decent chance he will be signed before camp starts on Thurs.

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