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whats the most Redskins thing the Redskins can do ?  Sign a Big name free agent thats way past prime and done with NFL

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1 hour ago, NE.Jon said:

whats the most Redskins thing the Redskins can do ?  Sign a Big name free agent thats way past prime and done with NFL

When I saw that article that was my exact thought :lol:

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2 hours ago, NE.Jon said:

whats the most Redskins thing the Redskins can do ?  Sign a Big name free agent thats way past prime and done with NFL

Yeah, but *THIS* time it's gonna work!!!

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000949610/article/redskins-to-sign-veteran-rb-adrian-peterson

 

Quote

Redskins to sign veteran RB Adrian Peterson

Adrian Peterson is returning to football for the first time since suffering a season-ending neck injury in mid-December.

After putting the four-time All-Pro through a tryout on Monday, the Washington Redskins are set to sign Peterson, NFL Network Insider Ian Rapoport and NFL Network's Mike Garafolo reported, via a source informed of the situation.

The Redskins suddenly find themselves short-handed in the backfield after losing Derrius Guice, Samaje Perine and Byron Marshall to injuries in the first two preseason games.

Although coach Jay Gruden initially ruled out the idea of importing a mercenary veteran when Guice went down, he realized he was facing dire straits with Perine and Marshall out and receiving specialist Chris Thompson still working his way back from a broken fibula.

When news broke Sunday of impending visits for the free-agent trio of Peterson, Jamaal Charles and Orleans Darkwa, Gruden emphasized that he's not looking for a starter. A slimmed-down Rob Kelley is locked in as the first-team tailback.

"We've had very [unlucky] situations with our running backs," Gruden explained. "If something else happens, we are going be really, really, really thin. We want to make sure we're covering all our bases right now."

An afterthought in free agency after the Cardinals released him in March, Peterson has a prime opportunity to climb the depth chart in Washington.

Although the former Vikings superstar averaged a paltry 3.4 yards per carry last season, he broke the 130-yard mark twice in six games as Arizona's bellcow. Behind a porous offensive line, he showed impressive burst, power, jump-cuts and breakaway speed as a runner.

"There's no doubt that Adrian still has some juice left in the tank, particularly from a run-skill standpoint," Cardinals general manager Steve Keim noted in February. "He still runs with a lot of anger and aggressiveness, and has the type of contact balance you look for in that position.

"But in today's day and age, we all know that you have to be able to catch the ball out of the backfield, you have to be able to do a lot of different things. So versatility is really a key."

Therein lies the rub. Reluctant to add Peterson as a complementary piece in a committee attack because his presence on the field too often telegraphs a running play, teams have begun to view Peterson as a one-dimensional power back best utilized in cases of emergency.

After training with the 33-year-old this summer, though, Redskins Pro Bowl tackle Trent Williams insists Peterson "hasn't slowed down a step."

"I don't understand the stigma when people get 31, 32, 33 -- they somehow just slow down," Williams said Sunday, via the Washington Times. "You don't. That's a gifted athlete, you know? He has a gift. Did Darrell Green ever lose his speed? He didn't. Some things are just always with you. It's you, it's your makeup, it's your DNA. ... So, no, he's the same athlete that you're used to seeing."

If Williams' scouting report proves to be credible, Kelley could end up losing his stranglehold on the lead-back role as the season plays out.

 

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He averaged 3.5 ypc with Arizona. That's better than every back on their roster thar isn't fragile Chris Thompson. 

 

He'll get playing time if he's on the roster

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53 minutes ago, EricAllenPick6 said:

He needs 36 yards to pass Jim Brown on the all time rushing list.  How many weeks do you think it will take?

Is that why he hasn't retired?

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He looks so happy!

Adrian-Peterson-a-los-Redskins.thumb.png

 

 

 

 

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: 

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Anybody else see APs preseason debut?  He looked pretty good.  Finishing runs strong.  Running with some determination.

 I’m not going to read too much into preseason stats, but his performance is intersting.  He may be the Redskins starting RB.

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He averaged more yards per run(5.1) than total completions by Alex Smith(3)

?

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What always impressed me with AD is he always seems to fall forward when he's tackled. So he gets an extra yard or two at the end of every run. He did a lot of that on Friday.

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I’m sooooo happy they lost.  They were sniffing themselves all week long, after that win in week one.  The talking head radio types, and all the callers were talking about going 4-0 to start the season with the saints not looking great and A-Aron hobbling.  Such cocky #@$&ers

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The Redskins are now honest about their attendance. And it’s not pretty.

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The Washington Redskins couldn’t deliver a victory in their home opener at FedEx Field on Sunday. They couldn’t even manage a touchdown against the Indianapolis Colts, hardly a defensive force, scoring all their points in a 21-9 defeat on the right leg of place kicker Dustin Hopkins.

And the biggest cheers came before kickoff — showered not on a Redskin but on Washington Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin, who sported a customized No. 8 Redskins jersey for his role in the coin-toss ceremony.

It hardly took the chants of "Ovi! Ovi!” to illustrate what has become increasingly apparent over the 19 years of Daniel Snyder’s ownership: The Redskins’ hegemony in the Washington sports market is a shadow of what it once was.

The Redskins, who have made the playoffs just twice in the past decade, must now compete for fans’ dollars, time and loyalty with the Capitals, Nationals, Wizards and D.C. United, which this season opened a new stadium near Nationals Park. And on Sunday, many simply stayed away.

 

The announced attendance of 57,013 was the lowest for a Redskins home opener in the 21-year history of FedEx Field — down more than 21,000 from the 78,658 who attended the Redskins’ 2017 home opener against the NFC East rival Philadelphia Eagles.

It also broke what the Redskins have claimed is a 50-year streak of home-game sellouts.

Swaths of empty seats attested to the story, along with the large section of 300-level end zone seats that was covered with advertising signage and, at the opposite end zone, the removal of seats to create an open-air plaza for fans to mingle, order drinks and keep tabs on other NFL games via 30 HD TV screens.

"A lot of fans have lost that ‘hope springs eternal,’ ” said Dave Kerrigan, a Redskins fan for nearly 30 years who had seats in the front row, musing about the sparse turnout. "The hurricane might’ve had a little bit to do with it; people were on the fence because it looked like it was going to be a big washout weekend a week ago. I’d like to think it was more that — than a loss of support for the team.”

Support was in short supply, however, among many who showed up for the 1 p.m. kickoff. Fans booed after the Redskins were forced to punt on four of their first five possessions. They booed with more vigor as players trudged to the locker room at halftime, trailing 14-3. And they streamed for the exits with five minutes remaining in the game — plenty of time for a high-functioning offense to erase a two-score deficit.

The jeering from the team’s own fans in the home opener caught the attention of Redskins running back Adrian Peterson, 33, who spent the bulk of his 12-year NFL career in Minneapolis.

"It was a new one for me,” Peterson said in the locker room afterward. "It was different.”

For Dan Flynn and Carl Noble, buddies from Columbia, Md., who said they’ve been Redskins fans their whole lives, the steady erosion of the team’s core fan base has worked in their favor. Flynn gave up his season tickets in 2012, he said, because he can find cheaper tickets in the FedEx Field parking lot.

On Sunday, he and Noble watched from the open-air fan plaza in the west end zone — a new feature this season to which both gave a hearty thumbs-up.

Said Noble: "You can buy the cheapest ticket you can get now and watch it from here. So why would we pay anything else? Why would we pay season tickets if we could watch the game from right here?”

Sunday’s patchy crowd continued a decade-long slide.

Average attendance for Redskins games at FedEx Field has dropped 15 percent since 2007 — from 88,090, when the Redskins led the NFL in attendance, to an average of 75,175 last season, which ranked sixth among the league’s 32 teams.

To convey the impression of demand, the team removed thousands of seats at least three times from 2010 to 2015 — the vast majority in the upper deck — scaling down what once was the NFL’s largest stadium, at nearly 92,000, to roughly 82,000.

On Sunday, capacity was smaller still, though team officials declined to provide an updated figure.

In an effort to improve fans’ game-day experience, the Redskins, under new President of Business Operations Brian Lafemina, stopped selling seats with obstructed views, created the fan plaza and upgraded the pregame and in-game video entertainment.

 

After acknowledging in June that a waiting list the team had claimed once numbered 200,000 no longer existed, the Redskins launched a multimedia marketing campaign to promote sales of season tickets as well as tickets to individual games. The team also is offering group-ticket discounts and set up an information booth Sunday, which they had designated Maryland State Employees Appreciation Day.

Jason Christenson, 50, a Virginia Beach native who has loved the Redskins since childhood, as his father and grandfather did before him, said he considered dropping his four season tickets after the 2017 season, offended by the actions of NFL players who knelt during the national anthem.

"But I thought about it, and nobody on the Redskins kneels. And every year they have a salute to the military,” noted Christenson, who sported a burgundy T-shirt with an "R” set against a stylized background of stars and stripes on the front. On the back, it read, "I Stand For Our national anthem.” An employee at a Virginia Beach flooring company, he designed the shirt himself and said he has sold about 200.

Even though Christenson kept his four season tickets in Section 106, he spent much of Sunday’s game standing in the fan plaza, enjoying the chance to get a drink, stretch his legs, talk to other fans and not miss a key play.

In many respects, the NFL is grappling with the same issues the Redskins are in shoring up their fan base.

Professional football may still be the country’s most popular sport, but declining TV ratings suggest that significant numbers of fans are turning away. Whether they object to players protesting during the national anthem — a gesture intended to call attention to social and racial injustice that has been politically recast as a lack of patriotism — or are troubled by evidence linking repetitive head trauma to irreversible cognitive damage is difficult to quantify.

But it’s undeniable that even ardent fans have decided they don’t need to buy season tickets — or tune in on Sundays — to follow football. They can buy tickets on a whim via an app on their phone. They can stream game-day action on mobile devices. They can cherry-pick highlights on the NFL Network’s Red Zone channel.

For all those reasons, it’s possible NFL TV ratings will never be what they once were. It’s also possible that the Redskins’ game-day attendance won’t either.

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My wife's Aunt and cousin were born and raised in the DC area and are diehard Washington sports fans. They have season tickets and the only reason they still keep them is because they have been in the family for over 30 years. While I understand that reason for keeping them, there has to be a time when you say enough is enough, give them up to another sucker, and just purchase games in the parking lot like it said in the article. To be honest,  if they did that, they would probably get better seats at a cheaper cost.

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 Over the past 10-plus years, the Redskins are now 8-7 straight up when favored by at least 6 points at home. That’s the worst winning percentage in the NFL. 

 

:roll: 

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3 hours ago, BatteredFanSyndrome said:

I really have to go back in the memory bank to recall an atmosphere worthy of attending.  But I recall the late season playoff run in 2005.  The environment was amazing.  The crowd was raucous, there were division opponents fans in the house but nowhere near what you see today, and they left sad.  Also, the late season run in 2012 felt magical.  There is just something about being there, the energy, etc. when things are going well.  Unfortunately those times are so few and far between most fans remember the nauseating, embarrassing losses, being trolled by opposing fans on the way out, being stuck in traffic, with a lot less money in their bank account.

 

3 hours ago, carex said:

I think you all need to look up the definition of apathy

 

3 hours ago, BatteredFanSyndrome said:

 

I just did and found a picture of FedEx Field from last Sunday.

 

1 hour ago, Skinsinparadise said:

 

I've been flying up from South Florida for 15 years or so now for 1-2 home games a year.    And the changes are really noticeable. In the past, some teams would invade the stadium -- Pitts, GB. Dallas, etc.  Now it seems everyone does.    It's like there is no safe game without a loud presence of opposing fans.  Between that and no shows -- the atmosphere isn't what it once was.  Not that it was ever great but now at least from the sample of stadiums I've been to -- to me its easily the worst home field experience.

 

Conversely, I am finding road games more fun and leaning towards doing more of that.  Redskins fans travel and its fun to run into them and invade other stadiums.  My last two excursions, Arizona and NO were great -- much nicer stadiums and fan experiences there.

 

As for apathy, the 106.7 guys have really hammered it -- in the past a Redskins topic would get callers like crazy -- now according to them its nowhere near the same.

 

I think you got a lot of moving parts to it.  Bruce-Dan are front and center.  I think Kirk lighting it up (as I thought he would) thus far in Minny and Garcon and D. Jax getting off to hot starts puts salt in the womb.

 

I think Steinberg captures all of it well here.

 

D.C. Sports Bog Perspective

Sunday was a bad, bad, bad day for the Redskins

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/dc-sports-bog/wp/2018/09/17/sunday-was-a-bad-bad-bad-day-for-the-redskins/?utm_term=.cf847ef18520

 

1 hour ago, RandyHolt said:

The curtain has finally been pulled back for all to see, our trumpeting of consecutive sellouts has been a sham.  I think, for decades.

 

Another sham was the famous "wait list".

 

I wonder if we see 11th hour mass ticket giveaways (desperation PR stunt) to get the stands filled, if the away fans don't take over our stadium proper.

 

16 minutes ago, theTruthTeller said:

It's bad when the other team's fans invade, but it's horrible when no one shows up at all. When 30% of the seats are empty, it means people are turning down free tickets.

 

Somehow, the fun of being a Skins fan, in good times or bad, has been sucked away this year. I'm not a Alex hater, and I don't blame Alex, but he's the dark sunglasses you wear to hide a black eye.  It doesn't matter matter how nice the glasses are if everyone knows you're wearing them because you got punched out by a girl you offended.  It just makes it worse.

 

 

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Even Beer Vendors Have Turned On The Skins

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Fans aren’t alone: Even beer vendors hate being inside Jack Kent Cooke’s Folly.

The talk of the town after Washington’s no-silver-lining loss to Indianapolis on Sunday was how D.C.’s romance with the football team is in tatters. Bitterness began replacing bliss as the dominant emotion at some point early in the Dan Snyder era, but now apathy reigns supreme. Despite a sad and misleading PR blitz from the team and local media full of the same ol’ crap about a new fan-friendly attitude from management and bells and whistles for game goers, the home stadium had more empty seats than any opening day in franchise history.

There’s still some bitterness, mind you. A group of beer vendors showed up at the stadium on Sunday, not to sell but to protest. They’re peeved that the rate they get for working at Snyder’s stadium has been cut drastically and now falls far below what sellers make at other NFL venues.

Beer vendors in Landover work strictly on commission and tips, with a sliding scale. The commission is based on net sales (after sales tax is taken out, and with tips not included) with vendors getting 8 percent on their first $600 worth of sales for any one game, 10 percent on sales up to $2,000, and 12 percent on anything over $2,000. According to Perry Hahn, a career suds slinger who was among the protesting vendors, to reach the max level a vendor needs to sell a little over 200 beers, which typically go for $9.50 per 16 oz. can.

FedExField vendors used to be paid from 12 to 14 percent, say the vendors. Last year, Snyder brought in a new concessionaire: Chicago-based industry giant Levy Restaurants. Levy then subcontracted the beer vending to Event Management Solutions. Hahn and other vendors say EMS immediately slashed the employees’ pay rate to the current 8–12 scale.

Vendors say FedExField was already paying the worst commission of any football venue in the Mid-Atlantic region even before the recent wage cut. Sellers working just up I-95 at M&T Bank Stadium for Baltimore Ravens games, for example, get a commission of 13 percent to 20 percent, and reach the 20 percent bonus level after selling $1,500 worth of beer. Baltimore just cut the price of a beer to $7.50, which Hahn says is among the reasons Ravens fans drink more in-house than Skins fans.

I asked Hahn why there’s such a discrepancy in stadiums just 32 miles apart.

It’s the difference, Hahn told me, between Steve Bisciotti and Dan Snyder.

Baltimore isn’t the only place that beats the crap outta Landover for pay rate. Vendors say they make a flat 15 percent commission selling at Philadelphia Eagles games, and also get 15 percent at football games at the University of Maryland and University of Virginia.

D.C. is the worst, what’s going on is the worst, says Neal Harol, who’s been a stadium vendor since 1971, the last 30 years in the Washington market.

Harol, 64 years old this week, says he still works 300 events annually across the U.S., and that the peak of his career came with a spate of $100,000 years during the Philadelphia Phillies’ run about a decade ago. He says current trends in the industry mean he’ll never make that kind of money from beer again.

It’s not the easiest scale to understand if you don’t do this, but [commission cuts in D.C.] is a big deal, Harol said. Losing one point doesn’t sound like a lot, but one point can mean about $80 a shift.

Hahn has seen his share of shifts, too, and his most glorious days hawking booze might also be in the rearview mirror. But what a run he’s had! Hahn is maybe the most famous beer man in sports history. To fans of the Baltimore Orioles, he’s RoboVendor. In the 1980s, vendors in the stands weren’t allowed to give fans the can; sellers had to open and pour the beers into cups. Hahn thought that transfer method was too slow, so he put his mechanical engineering degree from the University of Maryland to work and ended up with a U.S. Patent 5, 228, 203, the Tandem High-Speed Can Opener, a battery-powered gadget he attached to his wrist that rips the tops off two beer cans at a time almost instantly. He debuted the device during the O’s’ last game at Memorial Stadium in 1991, and became a star at Camden Yards. I can now open and pour a case of beer in 60 seconds if I have to, Hahn told me in 1996.

Almost all stadiums let the fans keep the can or bottle nowadays, so Hahn’s whirring gizmo has become obsolete. Cooperstown should find a place for it.

Hahn and Harol say things are so bad for vendors in D.C. these days that they’ll travel even farther than Baltimore to get a fairer wage. Whenever the Ravens are on the road and Skins and Eagles are both playing home games, they and lots of their beer selling peers commute to Philadelphia.

Nothing will change for the better in their home market, they and other D.C. vendors say, until the sellers form a union to take on Levy, EMS, and Skins management. A group of peeved vendors showed up at FedExField on Sunday to hand out union cards and information sheets about the pay discrepancies between their hometown and others.

There was also a movement to get vendors to boycott FedExField this coming Sunday, when the Skins will play the Packers. The Eagles and Ravens will also have home games, and vendor organizers advised those that weren’t already planning on staying away from FedExField to do so.

I will not work there, Harol said. I will not contribute to what they’re doing.

Skins spokesman Tony Wyllie told Deadspin that while the team is responsible for bringing the new concessionaire, Levy, into the stadium, vendor issues are not the team’s problem. Our deal is with Levy, Wyllie said. [Beer sellers] are not Redskins employees. We have no insight on what they pay. We don’t make the deals.

Harol points out, however, that the team got in bed with the concessionaire, and therefore sanctions Levy’s and EMS’s wage-cutting ways. Harol says he came away from FedExField last weekend hopeful that enough other sellers will join him in boycotting that stadium in favor of Ravens and Eagles games to get Skins management to notice. He said the Skins games typically used to draw about 100 vendors, but that only about 70 showed up for the Colts game. Hahn said he’s heard that the concessionaire intends to import beer men to D.C. from Atlanta to mitigate any shortage of local sellers.

Harol said the awful treatment of beer men at Snyder’s venue isn’t the only reason veterans of the industry will know to stay away. The biggest rule in this business is: You gotta go where the crowds are.

That’s surely not a Skins game.

 

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Screenshot_20180923-072105.thumb.jpg.ff6a3af038a37311110fc6e3de482559.jpg

:lol: :lol:

ES has changed a lot over the past couple of years. They still have their homers, but for the most part it's open season on bashing Snyder and the entire organization. Even the mods do it now. That was unfathomable as recently as a couple of years ago. 

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