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Rolling R-word's (Trademark Pending) updates..

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3 hours ago, Don Corleone said:

 

That's tough. I just read this on ESPN. Luckily Alex Smith is mobile because he's going to be running for his life with all these new starters on their OL. 

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Colt McCoy has also not exactly been a picture of health over his career, so I'd put good odds that Mark Sanchez plays this year. 

What's everyone's thoughts on Alex Smith's ability to come back from this?  It's a devastating injury, he's 34 and was not all that awesome this year at all.  

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lol

 

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Sean Taylor died 11 years ago today after being shot in his Florida home. For those looking to honor his memory on this awful anniversary: Dan Snyder is selling a crappy Sean Taylor doll.

[UPDATE, 2:06 p.m.: Sometime between when we published the blog and now, the Skins pulled the Sean Taylor plush from their online store. RIP, Sean Taylor plush doll.]

Other than the No. 21 jersey and the packaging, there’s nothing about the doll that indicates it’s Sean Taylor. (What the hell’s going on with that nose anyway?) Taylor, who played for the Skins from 2004 to 2007 and is revered by the fanbase as an all-time great, is the only plush doll in Snyder’s team’s online store that is ID’d as an actual former player. The other plush offerings are a Redskins Monkey for $25 and a Super Hero Dog in team colors for $30. The Taylor figurine comes in relatively cheap at $20.

The crass Taylor tribute solidifies Snyder’s reputation as a guy who’ll ignore the whiff of insensitivity in pursuit of a buck. Never forget: He’s the dude who sold 9/11 memorial caps for profit when nobody else was.

An alternative, cheaper way to remember Taylor on this day: Here are a couple highlight compilations from Taylor’s days at the University of Miami and with the Skins. They’re incredible.

Disclosure: Dan Snyder once sued the author for writing mean things about him.

 

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On 11/19/2018 at 2:00 PM, EricAllenPick6 said:

Colt McCoy has also not exactly been a picture of health over his career, so I'd put good odds that Mark Sanchez plays this year. 

What's everyone's thoughts on Alex Smith's ability to come back from this?  It's a devastating injury, he's 34 and was not all that awesome this year at all.  

I think Smith is done.  Bad injury.  Going to be what,  35? Ya its over for him.  

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One heck of a banner day for this franchise. Desecrate the memory of a beloved player, sign a scumbag woman beater for good measure.

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44 minutes ago, Don Corleone said:

 

Is this really a surprise from that scumbag organization? Let's see how Allen and Snyder spin this.

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2 hours ago, KOJO said:

One heck of a banner day for this franchise. Desecrate the memory of a beloved player, sign a scumbag woman beater for good measure.

Maybe they'll bring back the original lyrics to HTTR and go for the trifecta

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16 hours ago, vsptroops said:

Is this really a surprise from that scumbag organization? Let's see how Allen and Snyder spin this.

 

I'm going with "we believe him"

16 hours ago, lovemaskins said:

If Kavanaugh is good enough for the Supreme Court then welcome home Reuben.

 

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Smart move by the Redskins. If he didn't do it the Redskis got a really good player. If he did do it, then the Redskins really didn't give up much.

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From USA today: 

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"Today we have claimed the rights to LB Reuben Foster," Williams said. "The Redskins fully understand the severity of the recent allegations made against Reuben. If true, you can be sure these allegations are nothing our organization would ever condone."

But that’s complete hypocrisy. 

In 2014, after NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell handed down a stiff punishment to Ray Rice for beating his fiancée, Snyder issued a statement praising the move. 

"Roger Goodell has always had the best interests of football at heart, both on and off the field,” Snyder’s statement read. "We are fortunate to have him as our Commissioner. The entire Washington Redskins organization strongly endorses his efforts to eradicate domestic abuse and the independent investigation into the Ray Rice assault.”

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/columnist/mike-jones/2018/11/27/washington-redskins-reuben-foster-domestic-violence/2132119002/ 

This is desperate move from a GM that knows he's team is about to go down in flames.

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Redskins' claim on Reuben Foster is peak Dan Snyder hypocrisy

A little over one year ago, when NFL team owners were rocked by social protests sweeping through their locker rooms, a cabal of shot-callers in the fraternity moved to clamp down on a hemorrhaging public relations issue. President Donald Trump was rattling his political saber over kneeling players, segments of the fan base were roiled and sponsors were complaining. Someone needed to apply pressure on commissioner Roger Goodell and fellow owners to protect the league’s bottom line.

So the Washington Redskins’ Dan Snyder stepped up in support, repeatedly backing Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones and attacking a protest issue that appeared to be threatening the NFL’s reputation. Going from the guy who stood arm-in-arm with players against Trump’s political capitalism, then spearheading a now-dead directive to sanction players demonstrating for social justice and racial equality on gameday.

This is the Dan Snyder brand of selfish hypocrisy. Do whatever suits you, whenever it suits you.

Keep in mind, this is the same owner whose franchise staged an astoundingly inappropriate team cheerleader event in Costa Rica – in which a half-nude calendar shoot became a creepy dating opportunity for VIP ticket-holders and sponsors. The same Dan Snyder whose lucrative team name and logo are considered to be among the most deeply offensive relics in modern sports. The guy who applauded Goodell’s significantly flawed handling of the Ray Rice domestic violence investigation, then later cheaply signed linebacker Junior Galette in the wake of serious abuse allegations. Whose Redskins merchandise store has sold such shockingly crass for-profit items as 9-11 remembrance team hats and plush dolls of murdered safety Sean Taylor.

Whatever suits you, whenever it suits you.

And now this week’s edition: adding linebacker Reuben Foster two days after an arrest stemming from his second domestic violence allegation in 10 months. An allegation that led to Foster’s third arrest in 2018 and astonishingly took place in the 49ers’ team hotel on Saturday night, prior to Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. An incident embarrassing enough that it will leave a distinct bruise on the reputation of San Francisco general manager John Lynch, who repeatedly lauded Foster’s growth as a person and player before reaching a breaking point.

By Tuesday night, 31 NFL teams – including the linebacker-needy, damaged-goods assembly line known as the Cincinnati Bengals – had decided Foster should be made to wait for future employment. That is a hell of a statement, considering his status as a wildly talented first-round pick from the 2017 draft. It’s the kind of currency that usually has NFL personnel men lining up around the block, yet nearly 97 percent of the league’s teams backed away from this one. All except for the Redskins.

Because … hey, low-risk opportunity, right? Perfect pickings for that whatever-suits-you, whenever-it-suits-you business model.

Here’s what that low-risk opportunity looks like: There is a police report alleging Foster pushed his on-again, off-again girlfriend, slapped her across the face and knocked a phone out of her hand. This is the same girlfriend who previously alleged – then recanted – a story of Foster punching her repeatedly in the head and breaking her phone. There is also a reality of (in no particular order): Foster failing a drug test at the NFL scouting combine; getting booted from the event for a heated altercation with a hospital employee; getting suspended two games for substance and personal conduct-related violations; being the focus of an investigation by NFL domestic violence czar Lisa Friel; and having been removed from multiple draft boards in 2017 because of a string of serious red flags that surfaced in the pre-draft process (chief among them a nightclub shooting in college that Foster witnessed, ending in the death of one of his close friends).

That’s what this waiver claim encompasses. More red flags than a military parade in China. A situation that has reached a level so serious that the NFL immediately placed Foster on the commissioner’s exempt list, which bars him from playing or practicing in the league until the league sorts out the latest allegations against him. A move that was previously applied to defensive end Greg Hardy following a ghastly domestic violence investigation involving his former girlfriend, and to running back Adrian Peterson, the current Redskins running back who was indicted in 2014 for beating his son with a switch while playing for the Minnesota Vikings.

https://sports.yahoo.com/redskins-claim-reuben-foster-peak-dan-snyder-hypocrisy-051501143.html

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Report: Bruce Allen "masterminded” Reuben Foster move

Washington’s decision to claim linebacker Reuben Foster on waivers didn’t come without dissenters. Which means that, in time, the naysayers could prevail.

Les Carpenter and Kareem Copeland of the Washington Post report that Washington "decision-makers were said to be divided” on whether to claim Foster., and that the front office was "far from unanimous.”

Team president Bruce Allen "masterminded” the decision, according to the report.

That term implies that a level of complexity and nuance that a decision to pick up a player who has been discarded by another rarely has, but it’s not every day that a former first-round pick is available for reasons independent of his football skills. If, as it appears, there were team employees who didn’t want Foster, Allen had to find a way to get others in line with the move.

Whether they stay in line with the move remains to be seen. Given the widespread criticism of the acquisition of Foster, plenty of front-office personnel who were saying "no” on Tuesday may be declaring "I told you so” today. And if the so-called mastermind can’t hold together a fragile consensus, Foster could be one negative report away from becoming a former member of the team.

Regardless of whether Allen made it happen, the decision sticks squarely to owner Daniel Snyder. Viewed as renegade last year when he supported the effort of Jerry Jones, fueled in part by a six-game suspension levied against Ezekiel Elliott, to block the Commissioner’s extension, Snyder’s acquisition becomes a middle finger to the powers that be, taking attention away from football and giving the media a non-football issue that has been discussed and dissected in a way that makes the league look bad.

https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2018/11/28/report-bruce-allen-masterminded-reuben-foster-move/

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I was just about to post this.  They are all like

tenor.gif?itemid=8707324

 

 

 

Nah, not at all like the R-words to throw their own players under the bus :roll: 

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Daniel Snyder’s biggest issue with Redskins fans is his failure to understand them

One by one, Daniel Snyder creeps into the heads, the water-cooler conversations and the kitchen table chats of his Washington NFL fans and forces them to abandon their love of his team because they find him so consistently and unendingly at odds with their core values.

Basically, Snyder insults them. He spits in their faces and thinks he can get away with it, even though the massive evidence of empty seats in his own shrinking stadium should wise him up.

So, one by one, they leave, seldom because of any one decision, but because of his annual avalanche of actions that range from the annoying to the infuriating.

After 20 years as owner, Snyder can’t or won’t change. So, the trajectory of his team’s popularity now seems cast in stone: down, down, down, year after year, with brief upticks for occasional rays of light, such as the mirage of this season’s 6-3 start.

At this rate of fan alienation, Snyder’s team probably will fall behind the Stanley Cup champion Capitals and Nationals in local popularity within a decade.

If the Wizards and United want to dream of passing the Snyderskins, then within 20 years, aided by the NFL’s nightmare with CTE, that could happen, too.

This week, Washington demonstrated its self-destructive modus operandi again. Desperate for any kind of talent upgrade in the aftermath of the gruesome injury to quarterback Alex Smith, it was the only team in the NFL who would touch Reuben Foster, the troubled young linebacker who has been arrested three times this year. A few days ago, he was accused of hitting his girlfriend.

Snyder’s team did no serious investigation of Foster’s character or recent issues by reaching out police. They claimed they talked to ex-Alabama teammates who now play for Washington who vouched for him strongly. When asked about this, the first two (of six) former Crimson Tide players said: No one talked to me.

Earlier this year, desperate for a running back after a season-ending injury to their second-round draft pick, Snyder’s team signed unwanted Adrian Peterson, who in 2014 reached a plea deal to resolve his felony child abuse case stemming from him disciplining his young son with a tree branch. From a football standpoint, that move helped the team. But just like dozens of illustrations of Snyder’s disregard for the values of many of his fans, he ignored any blowback, or in the Foster case, even outrage. Snyder just grabbed a quick fix.

Peterson, a future Hall of Famer, has every right to be employed. Foster has not been convicted of anything. As a Washington coach said 15 years ago when asked about the ugly deeds of a newly acquired player, "He’s not in jail, is he?”

That seemed sort of funny at the time because scoundrel Steve Spurrier said it. But the Ol’ Ball Coach accidently defined the minimum standard for Danskins: You can’t be in prison — yet. This team would claim Paul Manafort on waivers.

It takes no imagination to predict the long-term demise of the Snyderskins fan base, only good eyesight. Look at FedEx Field.

About 15 years ago, a former GM of the Orioles told me, "You are watching the destruction of a great franchise.” Now, Baltimore, 47-115 last season, has lost 55 percent of its attendance from 20 years ago. It took many years for an awful owner to bring his own team that low. The deed was done in much the same manner as Snyder: with a hundred little horrors, not one huge malfeasance.

Despite removing seats from FedEx Field, Snyder’s team appears to have the NFL’s lowest percentage of occupancy, though the team won’t reveal the stadium’s current capacity. The team that fibbed for years about its infinite waiting list now sees its tickets sold on the secondary market for the price of a deluxe latte. Every game has thousands of empty seats, and many who do trek to the Dangeon cheer for the visiting team.

Snyder is hardly the first businessman to live by charging all-the-traffic-will-bear. But what’s stupefying is that, even though he grew up in the D.C. area, he seems to have no insight into his customer base.

Whether it is his intransigence toward changing the team’s nickname, or his attack on the City Paper for printing a list of dozens of his offenses to civility or the back-stabbing in his front office when ousting GM Scot McCloughan, Snyder’s team acts with all the tact, wisdom and compassion of the current White House.

Snyder’s own world view is irrelevant. But as a businessman, he ought to know the values and mores of his potential customers. This is an extremely progressive part of the country, where one could expect significant reservations about sticking so steadfastly to the team nickname, or giving the ball to a running back who has faced child abuse charges, or signing a linebacker just days after he’s been accused of hitting a woman. Maybe you could get away with some, or all, of those things in a different market. Here, any one of them could give fans pause. And one too many misgivings can lead to contempt.

Whether Snyder is defying environmental rules by cutting down trees on his property to improve his view or suing a financially-struggling elderly woman for not living up to her multi-year pledge to buy season tickets, the owner seems to have no idea where he lives or the widely-held views of his customers.

Ironically, Snyder’s team plays in one of the few parts of the country where he probably could have Peterson and Colin Kaepernick in the same backfield and not catch too much flak. Net-net, giving Kaepernick a shot in 2019, if he still wants it, probably would pull more fans back to the team than it would lose. To back such ideas in Washington isn’t brave. It’s almost cheap applause.

This morning, I got an e-mail from a reader that included the following: "How can I continue supporting the team when the leadership views the world so differently than me? . . . I am so conflicted.”

This is how you lose ’em, Dan: one at a time.

Snyder and his enabler-in-chief team president Bruce Allen think that this Foster flap will blow over. They’re right: Most controversies recede. But that misses the bigger problem. This team, year after year, finds new ways to kill the enormous love it inherited from previous, far better, stewards of the team. Snyder Syndrome is progressive.

In accounting, many businesses are sold for more than the value of their tangible assets. That excess intangible value is called "goodwill.” When Snyder took over the team, that goodwill — much of it residing in our hearts — was colossal. Now, every year, that goodwill is impaired.

Who knew that a relationship between a town and a team, begun 81 years ago, might someday be so deeply impaired by just one man who, while born and raised here, reflects the values and behavior of so few of us?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/redskins/daniel-snyders-biggest-problem-with-redskins-fans-is-his-failure-to-understand-them/2018/11/29/41f5197c-f413-11e8-80d0-f7e1948d55f4_story.html?utm_term=.c3f04b1e96e0

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Benefit of the doubt? The Redskins haven’t earned it, especially after Reuben Foster.

Let’s talk about benefit of the doubt for a moment. It seems the Washington Redskins and their blind loyalists — yes, they still have them, and the franchise should pray twice a day that those people remain so faithful — are pouting because constant distrust burdens the franchise. They can’t even make a waiver claim on a linebacker arrested three times in 2018 without being judged. Bless their victimized little hearts.

You want benefit of the doubt? Understand this about that kind of grace: Those who receive it have done something to earn it. Those who receive it have track records of success, good deeds, good intentions, sincere business dealings. Does that sound like this organization since Daniel Snyder took ownership in 1999? Don’t assume benefit of the doubt is a right and for darn sure don’t demand it.

Here is how Merriam-Webster defines benefit of the doubt: "the state of accepting something/someone as honest or deserving of trust even though there are doubts.” To accept Washington as honest or deserving of trust would require a level of fandom or gullible negligence so extreme that you should fear whether such believers are capable of navigating daily life. Focus on the word "honest.” It is the key to receiving benefit of the doubt. On Tuesday, after claiming Reuben Foster three days after his domestic violence arrest, Washington released a statement attributed to Doug Williams, the team’s senior vice president of player personnel and beloved Super Bowl XXII MVP.

As explanation — the only explanation the front office has been willing to provide to team beat writers because it has no commented its way through the rest of the week — for bringing in a player with so much baggage, the statement claimed the team made the decision to acquire Foster "after candid conversations with a number of his ex-Alabama teammates and current Redskins players who were overwhelmingly supportive of us taking this chance.”

On Wednesday, two of the most prominent former Alabama players on this team said they weren’t consulted about Foster. Washington didn’t ask safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, but okay, he’s older and would have known Foster in college only through the recruiting process because Clinton-Dix turned pro just before Foster arrived at Alabama. But Jonathan Allen is a different story. He played with Foster for three collegiate seasons, and they were in the same 2017 draft class. Allen is also the most important young player on the Washington defense, and he’s already a team leader in his second season. How the heck can you use "candid conversations” with ex-Crimson Tide members on your team to defend the move and not reach out to Allen? How the heck can you talk about "overwhelmingly supportive” players and not seek the opinion of the most relevant Alabama voice in the locker room?

There are seven Alabama-bred players on the roster, including two on injured reserve. Of the five healthy ones, two weren’t consulted. Ryan Anderson and Shaun Dion Hamilton declined to comment, which was peculiar. Daron Payne, the 2018 first-round draft pick, wasn’t in the locker room during media availability.

During an interview Thursday on ESPN 980, Williams admitted to consulting two players.

"We didn’t hold a convention,” he said.

Later, he added, "The two that we did talk to know him very well.”

Well, two is a number.

But it is misleading, at best, to defend the acquisition by claiming an "overwhelmingly supportive” Alabama faction without talking to more than a couple, especially when Big Jon Allen wasn’t one of them. Williams also claimed during the radio interview that all his key decision-makers agreed with the move to acquire Foster, even though The Washington Post and numerous media outlets reported it was not unanimous. (By the way, it is cowardly and disrespectful for Bruce Allen, the team president and the man who ultimately has to sign off on such a controversial move, to let Williams be the front-office face of the Foster debacle. Williams has been left to catch too much heat because his boss shrinks from accountability.)

This isn’t the worst thing the franchise has done, of course. But it illustrates why it would be foolish for any fair-minded person to give the organization the benefit of the doubt. It can’t be straight with you about simple details, and this isn’t an isolated case. Under Snyder, the franchise has a history of this type of manipulation, even though its deception — or outright lies — has been exposed on several occasions.

Washington did not thoroughly vet Foster. It did not call the Tampa police about Foster’s arrest Saturday; according to a USA Today report, the Philadelphia Eagles were the only team to do so. It did not seek some of the most credible opinions about Foster available in its own locker room. It saw Foster’s arrest and release from San Francisco as a team-building loophole to get a talented linebacker on its roster, not as a decision that deserved deeper consideration and patience. It wanted to avoid Foster reaching free agency because it craved his cheap, controllable multiyear contract, and by doing it this way, while Foster is in trouble and deemed untouchable by other franchises, there was no competition for his services.

So, sorry, this is all too shady to deserve any benefit of the doubt. If you’re shuffling, staring at your feet and feeling as if the franchise is being picked on again, you should know that you’re displaying significant willful ignorance in your outrage.

This franchise has a trust problem. The amazing thing, however, is that hope has rarely been a problem. Despite 19 years of controversy after controversy on Snyder’s watch, despite 10 losing seasons and just five playoff appearances under him, despite nine years of letting Bruce Allen infect the organization, despite failing to exceed 10 victories and failing to make back-to-back postseason appearances since 1992, the fan base has kept buying into new reasons for hope. There’s always a Robert Griffin III or Mike Shanahan or Scot McCloughan who makes people hit the reset button, stuff bad history into a corner and expect something different, something better.

The positive vibe lasts for a while. Then it gets crushed. It shouldn’t come back for more, but it does. We often highlight the signs of erosion — declining attendance and anecdotal evidence of diminished passion — but the truth is that weaker fan bases couldn’t persist through two decades of such misery. The damage could be a lot worse. The resilient support should be reason to do right by the fans, not use them and insult their intelligence.

Benefit of the doubt? The Redskins don’t get roasted regularly because it’s popular to roast the Redskins. They get roasted because they won’t stop being the most repugnant version of themselves.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/redskins/benefit-of-the-doubt-redskins-havent-earned-it-especially-after-reuben-foster/2018/11/29/06c03632-f40b-11e8-80d0-f7e1948d55f4_story.html?utm_term=.260fb9d736ed

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