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Kick him while he is down. Remind him that while they will have great draft position next year, they traded away their second for Sweat

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1 minute ago, paco said:

Kick him while he is down. Remind him that while they will have great draft position next year, they traded away their second for Sweat

:roll:

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Update: It looks like he stayed until the parents arrived.  

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75627321_2686239508136359_26132745434683

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38 minutes ago, paco said:

75627321_2686239508136359_26132745434683

The Washington Redskins: Where coaching careers go to die.... and then suddenly revive themselves once they rid themselves of the stank.

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Quote

What once seemed impossible is now undeniable: The Redskins have lost Washington

 

FedEx Field was mostly empty by the fourth quarter Sunday, after the Redskins fell behind 34-3 against the Jets. (John McDonnell/The Washington Post)

The prestige and status of the Washington Redskins within the D.C. area reached their absolute bottom — the lowest point in the existence of the franchise in this city since 1937 — on Sunday at FedEx Field.

Just 15 days earlier, a downtown parade celebrated the World Series victory of the Washington Nationals. The 2018 Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals have the most wins in the NHL. Over the past 18 months, a trend, many years in the making, has turned into a stunning transformation.

Washington has discovered that champions can live here. So why tolerate, let alone support, an atrociously run and constantly embarrassing franchise with a moral compass that is as twisted as a corkscrew?

 

Suddenly the distance from the heights of the Nats and Caps down to the disgraced depths of the local 1-9 football team — which fell behind the awful New York Jets by 31 points before losing, 34-17 — must be measured in miles, not just NFL yards.

The team’s reign as king of a football town may have ended quite some time ago as Washington amassed one of the worst records in the NFL over the past 25 years. But now the Redskins have fallen so low that they are no longer even in remote contention for top team in their own city.

Something that was unthinkable for my entire lifetime, since my Sammy Baugh-loving father took me to see the Redskins play the Baltimore Colts when I was 10 in 1957, has now become obvious. The change happened slowly. Then, over the past 18 months as the Nats, Caps and WNBA’s Mystics showed Washington could win titles, the flip happened fast: The Redskins lost Washington.

 

It took Washington owner Daniel Snyder 20 years to carve a trap door under his own franchise. Like a character in a cartoon, he has been sawing a circle in the floor around himself — with the billionaire the last person to know he was the one who would drop through the hole.

Suddenly you don’t have to look for data points to connect. Everything, everywhere, screams the same conclusion.

Before kickoff Sunday, tickets could be bought online for $10 — almost unthinkable to get into an NFL game. Good seats were available for not much more. The franchise that two seasons ago claimed it had a years-long waiting list for season tickets now sees its tickets fetching about half the price of a "Toy Story 4” ticket.

 

Walking into the stadium, fans of the teams were teasing one another — good-naturedly because both of their franchises are symbols of massive, long-standing mismanagement. "How can you pay to see that team?” a Jets fan yelled. "My tickets only cost $30,” came the answer.

Yet with the near-giveaway prices, the stadium was still half-empty, and half of the fans who attended wore the green gear of the Jets.

As Washington waited to receive the second-half kickoff, down 20-3, return man Steven Sims Jr., a rookie and still perhaps a bit naive, turned to the end-zone crowd just a few yards behind him. Over and over, he waved both arms upward, pleading for their support in a silent stadium. Finally, three fans, perhaps out of pity, stood up.

 

In recent weeks, seven-time Pro Bowl left tackle Trent Williams has become the latest symbol of the region’s disgust with Snyder’s ownership, an inept decade under team president Bruce Allen and a general petty ugliness with which the team treats everyone.

This year, the public has learned that Williams hates the team so deeply — based on years of what he considers bad medical diagnoses — that he prefers to lose millions in salary rather than play for it. How bad does a culture have to be — regardless of the details of beefs between the sides — to drive away the best player on the team?

The debacle at FedEx Field on Sunday, in which the Washington offense extended its streak of touchdown-less quarters to 16, was just the latest installment of How Low Can You Go.

 

Remember, this Jets team is a much-injured bunch that entered the game at 2-7, outscored by 108 points, a 2½ -point underdog and dead last in the NFL in offense.

In the first half of the first home start for Washington rookie quarterback Dwayne Haskins, the Jets countered with their own young but often inconsistent quarterback, Sam Darnold. Before halftime, Darnold led Haskins in passing yardage 184-6, the Jets had a ­20-3 lead, Washington had just one first down, Haskins had often looked confused when he had to go through a pass progression, and the game was over.

Year after year, it is the Redskins’ pattern — and perhaps their policy — never to admit that anything is wrong and always to say that they are "close.” That is always the word — coaching regime after regime. They hardly ever are. It’s self-delusion and marketed to suckers.

"I was really disappointed in how we played coming off the bye [week], where we put in so much time and effort,” interim coach Bill Callahan said.

Asked directly whether the team was "close” in this game and, if so, "close to what?” Callahan said: "I don’t think we were close today. I have to be honest with you.”

This team has dominated Washington sports conversation for so long, it’s hard to believe it can veer so amazingly close to irrelevance, parody and pity — for its remaining fans.

The franchise lost the NFL championship game as the Boston Redskins in 1936, then won the NFL title in 1937 as soon as it got to D.C. In its first nine years in Washington, it played in the championship game five times. The Redskins owned the town immediately, the Senators a distant second.

 

Even in two awful years — ­1-9-2 and 1-12-1 in 1960 and 1961 — you couldn’t get cheap tickets to a Redskins game. I know. As a 14-year-old, I would have paid more than $1.25 in odd-job money — the equivalent of $10 for the Jets game now — and rode my bike to RFK Stadium to see my team. Trust me: No such tickets were to be had. Now, half the stadium empty and half of the rest rooting for the enemy? A nightmare beyond comprehension.

Mark the moment in D.C. history. Long time coming — and deserved, one defeat and misdeed at a time. But the crash, when it came, happened fast. Washington, owned by a pro football team year-round — that’s over now. Hail to a much different future.

 

 

Just for juxtaposition, here is an article that was on their website back in 2006.  (Link no longer works, but for the curious, this was it: https://www.redskins.com/news/newsDetail.jsp?id=15982 )

Quote

ExtremeSkins Fan View: Cap Hell Rocks!

By Arthur Mills

ExtremeSkins.com

March 16, 2006

Don't hate us because we're beautiful.

No more blank, wondering stares, confused head scratching, frothing emotional outbursts, conspiracy theories or embarrassing, dismissive references to 2000. The Washington Redskins are the central theme of every NFL team message board out there. Here's a message to you all from all ExtremeSkins fans everywhere.

It's time to embrace the reality of it all. Simply, we're better than you.

That's it. Look no further. We are better than you. We're more fun. It feels better to be us. We've got flair. We're audacious, capricious, bodacious, supercalifragilisticxpalidocious.

Are you finally getting it?

Yes, yes, I know cap hell was supposed to be upon us. I know that's what you've been told. I feel for you, I really do. As you come to realize we're better than you, a second bit of stark reality must also penetrate. We're smarter than them.

Repeat after me.

The Washington Redskins are managed, coached and owned by highly professional people who know more about running a football franchise than ALL the unnamed, anonymous sources any reporter has yanked from the broom closet and quoted.

Don't take my word for it. Take the following words for it.

Brandon Lloyd, Antwaan Randle El, Adam Archuleta, Andre Carter, Todd Collins, Christian Fauria.

The question you all should be asking isn't, "How is all this possible?" No. The question should be, "How didn't we know this was all possible?"

Six years of assurances cap hell was on the way and you still allowed yourself to believe the tripe. Perhaps busting the cap hell myth as it relates to the Washington Redskins is just too painful a thing for media and fans of other teams to do.

Like a child coming to the harsh knowledge Santa doesn't exist, the media and opposing teams' fans are struggling desperately to hang on to the fiction that cap hell is on the way for the Redskins despite--literally--YEARS of demonstrated contrary evidence.

Here's the best part.

You don't have to hate us for what we're doing. You can do it, too.

"The thing I want to emphasize is this: We haven't done one thing that anybody else can't do," Joe Gibbs said after the introductory press conference for Andre Carter. "We have certain rules in the league. Here's the cap, here's the numbers, here's what you can spend, so everybody in the league can do what we're doing, it's just that they choose not to, many of them."

Deep down, this is really the issue, isn't it? You can do it too and you know it, but, your team doesn't do it, so, you have a hard choice. Hate your team, or hate us.

Say you're a fan of the Philadelphia Eagles. You always have all those many millions available, which somehow never seem to get spent. All week you're hearing how you have LeCharles Bentley locked up as your free agent masterstroke to solidify your offensive line.

You are giddy. You're thrilled. You know this is the guy you need. He fills a need and makes it a strength. You're excited about the prospects of adding such a substantial piece. Then, the Cleveland Browns call, offer a few more bucks to Bentley and Bentley winds up in Cleveland leaving you with nothing more than whimpering excuses that Bentley is from Cleveland and always wanted to play there.

Oh, hush.

Antwaan Randle El is from Chicago. He's always wanted to play there. Yet he's playing in D.C. Adam Archuleta admits he adores Lovie Smith after years playing for him with St. Louis and wanted to play with him in Chicago. Yet he's playing in D.C. Andre Carter just had to meet the Broncos because his father played there 12 years and he envisioned being the second generation of his family with the team. Yet he's playing in D.C.

And it's driving you crazy because you were so excited and thrilled about the prospects of adding a good player your management and owner can't figure out how to land while we get EVERY single player we shoot at.

We get to actually live the thrill and giddiness you only get to brush up against. And it's killing you.

Did we pay a premium for generally young players entering their prime with years left to play in the NFL? You bet we did. Kind of like when the Eagles lock up their own young players for a premium before they really emerge on the scene and everyone calls that genius. Think of it like that, only, with the component of actually being smart because an expensive 24-year-old promising receiver suddenly becomes a very cheap 26-year-old receiver when he grabs 80 balls.

See, we already had good players under contract. Now we have more.

As you struggle to find words to describe the coming cap doom heading our way, try to process one final thought. When you have that free agent you need all lined up and you don't get him, well, isn't that really what cap hell feels like?

I wouldn't know, because I don't ever have to feel that way.

 

 

F em.  May they burn forever.

 

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Apparently the skins printed up and sold a special, ‘one-time-only’ tshirt that they sold only at FedEx this past Sunday, on it was the skins and jets helmets and yesterday’s date in honor of the game, for ONLY $35.

im looking for a pic of the tshirt online. Haven’t seen it yet. 

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Please please please let that be true. 

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Who in their right mind would wear something like that? You're actually admitting to attending a Redskins game. 

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1 hour ago, Dawkins 20 said:

Who in their right mind would wear something like that? You're actually admitting to attending a Redskins game. 

To be fair, tweet doesn't show it's a set that comes with a cutout paper bag.

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1 hour ago, Dawkins 20 said:

Who in their right mind would wear something like that? You're actually admitting to attending a Redskins game. 

Maybe hipsters to wear ironically? 

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It reminds me of the 2012 preseason.  Where they were selling "QB showdown" "rivalry" teeshirts because its was RG3 vs Luck.  In a preseason game.  In their rookie year.  Never mind they never played each other in college.

 

RGIIILuck.jpg?uuid=_V2DROiJEeGTargB8aurG

 

 

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On 11/14/2019 at 11:07 PM, paco said:

Report: Redskins safety Montae Nicholson cooperative in overdose case

 

Basically, he dropped a girl off at 1:30 AM in the ER and took off. She died, he got caught.  Don’t know if he was involved yet. 

 

On 11/15/2019 at 3:27 PM, paco said:

Update: It looks like he stayed until the parents arrived.  

 

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Posted this in another thread.   But this needs to be a thing

 

20 minutes ago, paco said:

I may start making R-words games a tradition.

 

Not in Philly.  The 8 they play in Washington.  This weekend Upper level tickets are $5, Lower Level tickets are $20 and club level are $25.  They make more money on parking than tickets ($50)  :roll: 

 

 

We need to seriously consider doing a takeover when the eagles are on a bye.  How f'n awesome would it be to get a few thousand fans spend $5 to spend an afternoon trolling them on our weekend off.  And we are just about ready for kick off for Washington vs Buffalo and it is a sea of green in the stands :lol: 

 

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Parents all over greater Washington D.C. are likely preparing to take their children to see the long-awaited "Frozen 2,” which debuts in movie theaters this weekend.

Incredibly, it would cost less to take the kids to Sunday’s Washington-Detroit matinee.

As of this writing on Friday afternoon, there are numerous tickets for 1 p.m. kickoff at FedEx Field between 1-9 Washington and the 3-6-1 Lions going for $12 on SeatGeek. That’s not a typo: $12.

They’re in the 400 sections, which are high above the end zones, but there are tickets for Section 142, row 26, which are at the 40-yard line, that are only $51.

Tickets for a 1:30 p.m. showing of "Frozen 2” on IMAX at the AMC Magic Johnson Capital Center 12 are $13.99 for adults and $12.49 for children.

A spokeswoman for SeatGeek said the average ticket for Washington-Detroit is currently $58; league-wide, the average NFL game ticket is going for $186.

However, a $12 ticket is not a record: since SeatGeek began tracking the secondary market in 2010, the cheapest ticket was San Diego Chargers at Cleveland Browns on Christmas Eve 2016 — you could snag a $3 ticket to that game.

Last week’s home game for Washington, a loss to the New York Jets, had a recorded attendance of 56,426, well below FedEx Field’s capacity of 82,000. Judging by photos from that loss, Washington’s ninth of the season, that wasn’t the actual tickets used count.

One of the most storied franchises in the NFL, whose first-round rookie quarterback is making his third career start, and tickets are practically being given away on the secondary market.

It’s not a good look.

https://www.yahoo.com/sports/frozen-2-or-washington-detroit-tickets-to-the-nfl-game-are-cheaper-194807640.html

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On 11/18/2019 at 9:44 AM, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Since buying the team in 1999, Snyder's W-L record (over .500 is highlighted):

snyder.JPG.83e3e6773af2c11e40c27433a482c0dd.JPG

Damn. Never realized they never reached 11 wins in all his time. 

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Only team not to in 25 years :lol:

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And then you've got the Patriots who have only been UNDER 11 wins 5 times in that same time frame. :roll:

You can go to their games for less money than a movie ticket. :roll:

Redskins :roll: :roll: :roll:

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Snyder is still fairly young. Here's to hoping he stays in great health.

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6 minutes ago, EagleJoe8 said:

Snyder is still fairly young. Here's to hoping he stays in great health.

He's been the owner for 20 years and is still like the 2nd or 3rd youngest owner in the league. :lol:

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