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Aaron Hernandez - Found guilty of First Degree Murder (UPDATE: committed suicide)

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The best part is how he told Kraft he wishes the time of Lloyds murder would come out to the public bc he was in the club. How would he even know the time of the murder when to this day no-one knows for sure... moron. Sunk himself right there

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Speaking of attorneys what the hell was Hernandez's attorney on when he said in closing arguments that Hernandez witnessed the murder? There was no concrete evidence that Hernandez was at the scene and saw the murder, and his defense attorney just throws that out there last minute.. 

 

there was overwhelming evidence that hernandez was at the scene of he crime, it would have been stupid for the defense to suggest other wise, so instead of fighting the obvious, they took the angle that hernandez was an innocent by stander and was scared and didnt know what to do after odin was gunned down in front of him, because hernandez is such an innocent naive little child :thumbsdown:

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Freakin preschoolers who witness extreme acts of violence know enough to dial 911 but poor wittle 23 year old Hernandez "didn't know what to do" after his boys just turned one of their own into swiss cheese? GTFOH.

This "kid" BS excuse, which also always seems to come up when some 17-18+ year old with a rap sheet a mile long blows some innocent sob away, is 90% of what's wrong with this country. :nonono:

It is:

There are too many in this country who use that "he's such a nice kid" when stuff like this OR for example a careless act by someone who is killed by such act comes up.

The real tragedy is a man is dead.  That should not be forgotten.

 

 

Couldn't agree more.

I can't stand my peers or those younger than me for the most part. We have am entire generation of people who want all the play without any of the work. All the action but no regard for reactions. No accountability.

"Hey now... he lost his Dad when he was 16.. he didn't have it easy... give him a break"

-brain dead supporter

Makes me vomit. He's a cold blood murderer. Scum of the earth. The day we started making excuses for theives, addicts, murderers, rapists, etc is the day we started to head downhill as a country.

 

Hernandez was found guilty.  He should have known better and has no one to blame but himself for blowing many millions because of something relatively petty.

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Not that this should matter in a murder conviction, but the NFL does go on... how will this conviction affect the Patriots with regard to any cap concerns that came up with regard to Hernandez being released from the roster?

I don't recall at the moment, but did they take a cap hit? Can/will they be able to reclaim any money that was paid to him and did they otherwise owe him money that hadn't yet been paid that under normal circumstances, they'd have had to pay him?

How/will all of this impact the Patriots?

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Not that this should matter in a murder conviction, but the NFL does go on... how will this conviction affect the Patriots with regard to any cap concerns that came up with regard to Hernandez being released from the roster?

I don't recall at the moment, but did they take a cap hit? Can/will they be able to reclaim any money that was paid to him and did they otherwise owe him money that hadn't yet been paid that under normal circumstances, they'd have had to pay him?

How/will all of this impact the Patriots?

They've already taken the cap penalties.

 

 

The team signed him to a long-term contract worth nearly $40 million last August after he excelled in his first two seasons — and also stayed out of any sort of trouble. He had no prior arrests nor suspensions under the NFL's personal conduct policy.

 
Hernandez has already received a $9.25 million of a $12.5 million signing bonus.
 
There is language in the Collective Bargaining Agreement that allows teams to nullify contracts and recoup bonus money in the case of incarceration or other off-field transgressions, but Hernandez never missed any football-related activities before he was released.
 
Had the Patriots' primary concern been about money, it would have made more sense to allow him to remain on the roster while the legal proceedings play out. Had Hernandez been under contract and unable to play because he was in jail or suspended by the league, the Patriots may have been able to save up to $37 million.
 
"Whatever chance of recouping previously paid bonus may have died when they released him," said Andrew Brandt, a former agent and personnel executive for the Green Bay Packers, who now works as a business analyst for the NFL.
 
But now the Patriots will likely have to accept a major salary cap hit. On March 17, $1.137 million of Hernandez's $1.2 million salary became guaranteed. He will count a little over $5 million against the 2013 salary cap, which includes a guaranteed base salary of $1.323 million.
 
A $7.5 million hit against the salary cap comes in 2014 as the three remaining $2.5 million prorated cap charges from his signing bonus are consolidated instead of being spread over the 2014-16 seasons.
 
The Patriots could try to withhold money owed to Hernandez — like weekly payments owed during the season, or the $3.25 million due next March as part of his deferred signing bonus — and force Hernandez, his agents, lawyers and potentially the NFL Players Association to file a grievance to collect it.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nfl/2013/06/26/aaron-hernandez-released-new-england-patriots-arrested/2459401/

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The battle will soon be on between the New England Patriots and the NFL Players Association over money Aaron Hernandez and his camp believe they're owed.

 
A grievance is expected to be filed shortly because the Patriots did not pay an $82,000 workout bonus to Hernandez that was scheduled to be paid on Aug. 1, a source told FOX Sports.
 
The source said Hernandez, who has been charged with first-degree murder in the June death of Odin Lloyd, satisfied the requirements to receive his bonus by participating in the Patriots' offseason workout program this spring. The Patriots, however, did not send a check this month when the bonus was due, the source said. The grievance will be filed in the coming weeks unless the Patriots change their minds and write the check to Hernandez.
 
A Patriots spokesman declined comment when asked whether the bonus will be paid in the near future.
 
This latest development sets up an even bigger battle next year because Hernandez is owed a $3.25 million payment in March. It’s the final installment of the $12.5 million signing bonus he received as part of a contract extension signed last summer.
 
The Patriots could have easily recouped portions of Hernandez’s signing bonus by keeping him on the roster. Per the collective bargaining agreement, teams can recoup prorations of signing bonuses for as long as a player is incarcerated. It was an important part of the 2011 CBA negotiations for the owners, and they got their wish.
 
The problem for the Patriots is they released Hernandez in an attempt to limit the distraction of having him on the roster. Therefore, by the letter of the CBA, they seemingly forfeited any right to recoup any future signing-bonus money.
 
That doesn’t mean the Pats won’t try arguing they deserve to get some money back. The fact they haven’t paid Hernandez’s workout bonus, which was earned before Lloyd was murdered and Hernandez was arrested, seems to indicate their approach is to pay only what they’re forced to pay moving forward while trying to get back what they can get back.
 
In the end, the money Hernandez believes he has coming his way ($3.332 million in all) will likely have to be earned via an arbitrator's decision. That process is expected to commence shortly.

http://www.foxsports.com/nfl/story/new-england-patriots-aaron-hernandez-unpaid-bonus-money-battle-nflpa-081913

 

I'm not sure if they've continued to go after the money owed, or if they've won judgement, if they lose though, Hernandez will likely never see that money, it'll go to his victims families.

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Fortunately for them, they've stayed off of twitter so far.  Here's what former teammate and fellow knuckle dragger Brandon Spikes had to say:

 

IM CONFUSED ABOUT THE JUSTICE SYSTEM THESE DAYS !!!

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That's a nice touch.  Brandon should probably go stay a few nights with Aaron over at the hotel with bars on the windows.

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Aaron Hernandez finally taken down by a 5-foot-tall operations manager

FALL RIVER, Mass. – Lesa Strachan stands a little over 5-feet tall, wears her hair short and works as an area operations manager here in the small towns of southeastern Massachusetts. She is everyone. She is no one.

She is not, for sure, rich or famous or celebrated, like Aaron Hernandez, the NFL star turned murder defendant who was standing across a Bristol County courtroom from her Wednesday morning.

Lesa Strachan was the forewoman in Hernandez's murder case, personally selected by the judge because her intelligence and seriousness and leadership were easy to identify. As part of her job, Strachan had to rise up, look at Hernandez and read the verdict. She had to do something for perhaps the first time ever.

She had to hold Aaron Hernandez accountable for his actions.

"Guilty of murder in the first degree," Strachan said to the court.

Moments later, Hernandez was forced by a court officer to sit down, no longer afforded the right to stand like the presumed innocent. He was just another convict now, just another prisoner, just another punk … life without parole at age 25.

Lesa Strachan, slight of stature, dropped Aaron Hernandez like no linebacker ever could, called his bluff like no one else ever apparently would.

She ended his pretend gangster life of guns and tattoos and pseudo-toughness and shipped him off to prison, shipped him off to Walpole, just around the corner from Gillette Stadium where they once cheered his name and handed him $40 million contracts.

Hernandez tried to hide his emotions but couldn't quite pull it off. He shook his head at the jury and mouthed, "You're wrong," in a last futile attempt at intimidation. He looked at his sobbing fiancée, Shayanna Jenkins, and his mother Terri, and told them to "stay strong, stay strong." Neither one was, fleeing the court before he was even sentenced.

Finally, there was a brief moment. He was seated between his attorneys, with two burly bailiffs eyeing his every move before they threw ankle and wrist shackles on him.

Hernandez sort of leaned back and emitted a soft sigh, the first flash of reality finally settling in.

Aaron Hernandez had gotten away with everything, forever, perhaps even a couple of murders. A sucker punch back in 2007 at a University of Florida bar that left a bouncer with a ruptured eardrum ended with no one pressing charges because, well, it's a college town and he was a potential football star.

An incident in 2007 where two men were shot in their car after a dispute with some Gator players, including a man described as a muscular, heavily tattooed "Hawaiian" who matched Hernandez's description, didn't go far either.

Up in Boston, as a New England Patriot, police knew Hernandez, back in 2012, was at the same club as a group who upon leaving were ambushed at a stop light, leaving two dead, one wounded. Hernandez wasn't considered a suspect because, why would one of Tom Brady's favorite targets be involved in that?

In February of 2013, the shooting of a friend right between the eyes after a night at a South Florida strip club, went nowhere because the friend wouldn't testify; he just wanted to sue Hernandez for some riches, figuring he'd get a settlement because he was present for the Boston drive-by.

This was the absurd life Hernandez lived at a million miles an hour. Failed drug tests in college meant nothing. In the pros, the NFL system was just too easy to beat. Fame earned him the benefit of doubt, and if that wasn't enough, the ability to make everyone money bought him silence.

He never had to be responsible for anything. He treated half his family like dirt, his friends like employees and his fiancée like a doormat.

One of the narratives of Hernandez that proved inaccurate in the face of three months of court testimony is that his hometown of Bristol, Conn., and the gangsters and criminals from it, dragged him down. None of that was true.

He wanted that life, coveted that life, embraced that silly life, where the slightest sign of disrespect meant blasting away. The people he was around, the "gang" if you will, were cheap criminals and small-town thugs – Fish, Charlie Boy, Alexander Bradley, he of the now one eye? They took their orders from Hernandez, glomming onto his NFL millions, not the other way around.

Catching Super Bowl passes wasn't enough for Hernandez. The $1.3 million, 7,100-square-foot home in suburbs wasn't either. The loyal girlfriend and beautiful baby meant nothing. The fame and adulation were taken for granted.

Hernandez wanted to be tough, or some warped definition of the term. He wasn't tough. He isn't tough. He could ink up all the "Blood Sweat Tears" he wanted across his body but he didn't know the meaning of tough.

Sucker punches and drive-by shootings and needing three guys and a Glock .45 to attack an unarmed landscaper in a deserted field in the middle of the night is the opposite of tough.

It's pathetic.

He just played the part and caught the passes and for so long that was enough. That was all anyone cared about. All behavior was either excused or not pursued or ignored all together. He could play football, so the Patriots owner hailed his personal growth – "He's a super player and really a first-class guy," Robert Kraft said in 2012, a month after the double homicide in Boston – and the schools down in Bristol got him to cut a video to lecture young students about the values needed to get out, to climb up.

"Make sure you listen to your teachers," Hernandez told them, according to the New York Daily News.

Even his defense team tried to wish it all away. He'd paid the group a bundle and they were damn fine lawyers, but there was nothing here to work with. They had to admit he was at the scene. They had to acknowledge he drove the car that night. They could only attempt to claim that maybe it was a remote control, not the murder weapon, he was carrying in the home videos.

Even some of the best legal minds in Massachusetts were left falling back on the oldest of excuses for young talent, the lamest of get-out-of-trouble free cards, that he was just dumb and naïve and deserving of a second chance.

"He was a 23-year-old kid who witnessed something shocking – a killing committed by somebody he knew," defense attorney James Sultan argued, blaming it on someone else and mimicking who knows how many others from Hernandez's past.

Lesa Strachan and her fellow jurors didn't buy it, didn't buy a word of it, didn't, it seems, buy anything that the defense was selling for weeks. When the jury members met with the media after the verdict and was asked what part of the Hernandez smoke-screen defense was compelling, they offered weak smiles and nervous laughs and a "no comment."

"The evidence was compelling," juror Sean Traverse said.

Did they consider the defense argument that it was the other guys with him, hopped up on PCP? Please. How about the testimony from Shayanna Jenkins about how when she hauled a box with who knows what in it to a who-knows-where dumpster, it was just an innocent coincidence? More nervous laughs and shaken heads.

Deliberations, they said, took a week because there was so much evidence to go through – 135 witnesses, 439 exhibits. They wanted to be fair to Hernandez. They wanted to follow the guidelines. They wanted to be precise with the law.

Doubts and debate, there didn't appear to be much of either.

____________________

He'd gotten away with everything, forever, until his arrogance got the better of him – killing his own friend right near his home, leaving footprints and DNA behind, returning a rental car with a shell casing in it, failing to erase his own home security system. It was a mountain of self-created evidence.

His own stupidity proved to be the prosecution's best witness.

"You're wrong," Hernandez mouthed toward the jury as Shayanna wailed in pain and apparent disbelief, although that could've been just another act, too.

The jury never flinched. Not a single one of them.

Aaron Hernandez wasn't as tough as he thought. His tattoos and vicious looks didn't scare anyone anymore. His ability to catch passes over the middle carried no value.

Not when he was staring up at Lesa Strachan, no-nonsense Lesa Strachan, with a verdict sheet in her hand.

“It was the hardest thing that I've done in my life,” Strachan said.

So hard it sat Aaron Hernandez down, sat him down and out forever.

BOOM! Roasted!

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Spikes is getting blasted on Twitter :roll:

Remind us of your old but accurate Twitter saying...

:P

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there was overwhelming evidence that hernandez was at the scene of he crime, it would have been stupid for the defense to suggest other wise, so instead of fighting the obvious, they took the angle that hernandez was an innocent by stander and was scared and didnt know what to do after odin was gunned down in front of him, because hernandez is such an innocent naive little child :thumbsdown:

 

No theres not. All the evidence he was at the crime scene was speculative. They dont even know the exact time of the murder. The defense had no reason to set a narrative and say Hernandez was there and witnessed the crime. They have him at so and so time with Loyd and then coming home after. Besides testimony from the other two, who arent the most solid witnesses, there wasnt anything to prove beyond a reasonable doubt Hernandez was at the scene and witnessed the murder. Dont know what overwhelming evidence you think there is, but even all the legal experts say with no murder weapon, no solid key witnesses and nothing to prove he was actually there.

 

Even the Jury members said the attorney admitting Hernandez witnessed the murder had a huge impact with finding him guilty. You can still say he was an innocent bystander without admitting he watched the guy get killed. Say he was taking a piss or sleeping in the car or on the phone with someone. It was beyond stupid for the attorney to say Hernandez was there witnessed the murder, and then invited the murderers of his brother in law back to his place after. 

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All the evidence was speculative. They dont even know the exact time of the murder. They have him at so and so time with Loyd and then coming home after. Besides testimony from the other two, who arent the most solid witnesses, there wasnt anything to prove beyond a reasonable doubt Hernandez was at the scene and witnessed the murder. Even the Jury members said the attorney admitting Hernandez witnessed the murder had a huge impact with finding him guilty. You can still say he was an innocent bystander without admitting he watched the guy get killed. Say he was taking a piss or sleeping in the car or on the phone with someone. It was beyond stupid for the attorney to say Hernandez was there witnessed the murder, and then invited the murderers of his brother in law back to his place after. 

 

If Hernandez didn't kill Loyd... then that ahole better say who did, because he's about to spend the rest of his life in jail.

 

Since he was there, he knows who did it.

 

 

He's a bigger ahole if he let's that slide.

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If Hernandez didn't kill Loyd... then that ahole better say who did, because he's about to spend the rest of his life in jail.

 

Since he was there, he knows who did it.

 

 

He's a bigger ahole if he let's that slide.

 

Hernandez defense was that it was the two other guys who shot him. Dont get me wrong, im not defending the guy, i think he either killed him or gave the order to kill. I was just surprised how bad of a job the defense attorneys did with the closing arguments. And these are high priced lawyers, not public defenders. There's tons or articles by legal experts saying how bad the defense team did and how the closing arguments were a major factor in him being found guilty. 

 

http://www.ibtimes.com/aaron-hernandez-closing-arguments-how-defense-botched-odin-lloyd-murder-trial-1885235

 

http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/story/2015-04-16/aaron-hernandez-trial-prison-sentence-guilty-verdict-jury-defense-crime-scene-shooting-odin-lloyd

 

http://deadspin.com/jurors-say-aaron-hernandezs-defense-was-baffling-1697994540#

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http://www.foxsports.com/nfl/story/new-england-patriots-aaron-hernandez-unpaid-bonus-money-battle-nflpa-081913

 

I'm not sure if they've continued to go after the money owed, or if they've won judgement, if they lose though, Hernandez will likely never see that money, it'll go to his victims families.

Victim/s families will never see a dime.....if, IF he gets anything, it will be ALL going to his lawyers.

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While think Hernandez is most likely a serial killer, if Im being honest I dont think the prosecution proved their case and I think the jury made an awful lot of assumtions based on their comments.

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Hernandez defense was that it was the two other guys who shot him. Dont get me wrong, im not defending the guy, i think he either killed him or gave the order to kill. I was just surprised how bad of a job the defense attorneys did with the closing arguments. And these are high priced lawyers, not public defenders. There's tons or articles by legal experts saying how bad the defense team did and how the closing arguments were a major factor in him being found guilty.

http://www.ibtimes.com/aaron-hernandez-closing-arguments-how-defense-botched-odin-lloyd-murder-trial-1885235

http://www.sportingnews.com/nfl/story/2015-04-16/aaron-hernandez-trial-prison-sentence-guilty-verdict-jury-defense-crime-scene-shooting-odin-lloyd

http://deadspin.com/jurors-say-aaron-hernandezs-defense-was-baffling-1697994540#

No that wasn his defense. They didnt even mention it until briefly in ios closing arguements. Stupid stupid stupid. Dropped a huge bombshell on the jury right before diliberation leaving them with more questions than answers.

Should have came right out said they did it and he was afraid of them so he didnt call the police

The two other guys are on trial seperately and haven't rolled over on him. He had to blame them if he wanted any chance of seeing the light of day.

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While think Hernandez is most likely a serial killer, if Im being honest I dont think the prosecution proved their case and I think the jury made an awful lot of assumtions based on their comments.

The shell casing at the scene matching the casing found in the drivers side of the car rented by Hernandez is what did him in. That and his fiancé's laughable testimony. While the case was based purely on circumstantial evidence, there was a lot of it that pointed the finger squarely at Hernandez.

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No that wasn his defense. They didnt even mention it until briefly in ios closing arguements. Stupid stupid stupid. Dropped a huge bombshell on the jury right before diliberation leaving them with more questions than answers.

Should have came right out said they did it and he was afraid of them so he didnt call the police

The two other guys are on trial seperately and haven't rolled over on him. He had to blame them if he wanted any chance of seeing the light of day.

Um, if it's mentioned at any point during the trial, than that's his defense. If it came out even sooner he witnessed the murder it would of been even worse and a shorter trial. His defense should have been it wasn't him, he didn't see it, and let the prosecutors prove beyond a reasonable doubt he did

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Um, if it's mentioned at any point during the trial, than that's his defense. If it came out even sooner he witnessed the murder it would of been even worse and a shorter trial. His defense should have been it wasn't him, he didn't see it, and let the prosecutors prove beyond a reasonable doubt he did

It wasnt his defense. They did try to make the prosecutio prove he was there. Big mistake. That was easy. They knew the stratevy failed and tried to bail out at the last second. Who cars if the trail is long or short. his attorneys should have focused on realistic goals and if they admitted to him. Eing there but not being directely involved, showed remorse, get the jury to like AH, explain that AH had too much to lose and it made no sense to kill his good friend, blablabla, he may have gotten a better deal.

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