West Phlly Dan

Football cards from yesteryear

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Found a box of old football cards in the attic the other day. Now everyone says "sell them" or "how much are they worth".  Got me to thinking, before Becket came out with the price guide, what made you collect football cards when you were a kid?

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I mostly collected them so I could learn how to spell the names of cities.

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I collected baseball cards. I actually used them to learn players histories (Teams, stats, etc). 

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Sports cards are likely not worth very much today, unless it's a VERY special player or a VERY rare card. Especially football cards. They oversaturated the market in the 90s and killed it.

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the rarest card is T206 1909 Honus Wagner card there's like 50 or 60 made .. wish I had 1 it's called the Holy Grail of sports cards... It's worth 2.8 Million

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9 hours ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Sports cards are likely not worth very much today, unless it's a VERY special player or a VERY rare card. Especially football cards. They oversaturated the market in the 90s and killed it.

Yep, pretty much this right here. Damn shame, because I have a LOT of cards from the late 70's thru the 80's that are not worth as much as they might have been. <_<

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5 hours ago, Gmen4ever said:

Yep, pretty much this right here. Damn shame, because I have a LOT of cards from the late 70's thru the 80's that are not worth as much as they might have been. <_<

I have my father's baseball card collection from the late 30's to early/mid 40's, (probably 75 to 100 cards), and even they're not really worth all that much.

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The cards that are worth anything are when no one thought to save them.  Just like today, things that are worth money are the things no one thinks to save.  

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Back before thinking of only the monitary value of the cards. I remember the anticipation of finding your favorite player. Then your jaw would hurt from 2 hours of chewing that pink bubblegum.

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3 hours ago, West Phlly Dan said:

Back before thinking of only the monitary value of the cards. I remember the anticipation of finding your favorite player. Then your jaw would hurt from 2 hours of chewing that pink bubblegum.

Yep, it was awesome to find a card you needed for the set

And the gum....holy ish, it literally broke apart, it was hard as a rock most of the time lol

3 hours ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

I have my father's baseball card collection from the late 30's to early/mid 40's, (probably 75 to 100 cards), and even they're not really worth all that much.

Ugh...that sucks, especially for cards that old

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If you were a kid that lived outside of large cities in the early 80s, the only time you got any information on sports was through your local daily paper and about 5 minutes on your local news that might just offer the slightest of paragraphs of your favorite teams..  Baseball/Football cards were your only accessible way to find out any history or bios on players.

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I remember when they took the bubblegum out of the card packs because it damaged the last card next to the gum.  It sucked if that was your Ken Griffey Jr. or Michael Jordan card.... Nobody could chew the gum anyway. The baseball card store I went to also soldcandy, so we'd just use the change to buy crybabies and warheads.

I collected more baseball cards than anything. I'd read the stats, spread the cards out into positions and conduct my own fantasy games on the floor in my bedroom.

I remember opening up the card packs with a Beckett price guide in the other hand, and look up the price of each card while taking them out; thinking we had our college funds or retirement plans in place...  Those cards were probably worth more 20-30 years ago than they are today. Everybody has a bunch stowed away in their attic, so nobody wants them anymore.

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23 minutes ago, toolg said:

Everybody has a bunch stowed away in their attic, so nobody wants them anymore.

 

$3 Million Worth of Baseball Cards found in Ohio Attic

http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/07/11/3-million-worth-of-baseball-cards-found-in-ohio-attic/

For a century, a box of baseball cards sat in a Defiance, Ohio, attic . Then, it moved to a dresser for about two weeks before landing on an office desk for a few more days. But once Karl Kissner realized he was holding up to $3 million in circa 1910 top-condition baseball cards, he quickly moved the cardboard box across the street to a bank vault.

Defiance Ohio Baseball Cards

Heritage Auctions / AP

This undated photo provided by Heritage Auctions of Dallas, shows some of the more than 700 well-preserved 1910 baseball cards found in the attic of a house in Defiance, Ohio.

 

Kissner was working with family members cleaning out his aunt’s house—a house previously owned by his grandfather—in Defiance when his cousin, Karla Hench, ran across a green box with about 700 baseball cards packaged with twine. He knew they looked a little different—they were the smaller, tobacco-style cards of the early 1900s—but with so much stuff to clean, he set them aside for a couple of weeks. Once he had the time to go through the box, he realized that these cards of Hall of Famers Ty Cobb, Cy Young, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Connie Mack might be worth something. Yeah, try $3 million.

The cards, from a rare series dubbed E98 — the publisher’s name has been lost to history — were from 1910, according to multiple memorabilia experts who authenticated the stack of cards, according to the Associated Press. The series contains 30 different cards; half of the players depicted are now Hall of Famers. There are only a handful of the E98s in existence and the ones floating around certainly aren’t in the top-notch condition as ones from the box in Kissner’s aunt’s attic.

(PHOTOS: Michael Jackson Memorabilia Goes Up for Auction)

Experts say that any sports memorabilia found from this point forward will be compared back to the attic find.

Jean Hench, a daughter of Carl Hench, who died in the 1940s, most recently owned the house. Jean passed away in October and left her estate to her 20 nieces and nephews. Kissner was in charge of the estate and slowly sifted through the contents of the house — which still contained many of Carl’s belongings, which his daughter never threw out after his death in the 1940s. The baseball cards, with their pristine white borders and vibrant red backgrounds, were first found in late February.

The family believes Carl may have come across the cards when he ran a meat market in Defiance and received them as a promotional item from a candy company. Carl obviously stashed them away, unknowingly preserving the cards almost perfectly.

Experts rates cards on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being mint condition. None of the E98s previously found are in pristine condition (the nicest Ty Cobb E98 still around is rated as a seven); Kissner’s find includes 16 Ty Cobb cards graded at a nine and a Honus Wagner card at a remarkable 10 (a 1909 Honus Wagner card recently sold for $2.8 million).

Working with Heritage Auctions, which authenticated both the cards and the family history to determine the find was legitimate, the family hopes to sell the best 37 cards in August at the National Sports Collectors Convention in Baltimore for as much as $500,000. They will spread the rest of the cards out over a few years so as to not flood the market. The 20 relatives have split the 700 cards evenly and nearly all of them have decided to sell. There is no word on whether any of the rest have decided to stash the cards in an attic.

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Every collector wants the 100 year-old cards because they are rare.

Nobody wants the cards I collected in the 1980's and 1990's. They aren't rare, nor is anyone nostalgic for that era in baseball. I'll just keep them in the attic for now.

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6 minutes ago, toolg said:

Every collector wants the 100 year-old cards because they are rare.

Nobody wants the cards I collected in the 1980's and 1990's. They aren't rare, nor is anyone nostalgic for that era in baseball. I'll just keep them in the attic for now.

I remember when that story came out, those aren't just rare, those are VERY rare and in near mint condition. That's the kind of thing that people dream about lol.

I saw some of them on Antiques Roadshow, if I recall correctly.

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25 minutes ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

I remember when that story came out, those aren't just rare, those are VERY rare and in near mint condition. That's the kind of thing that people dream about lol.

I saw some of them on Antiques Roadshow, if I recall correctly.

Yup very rare like the card is named up there 1908 T206 Honus Wagner card is worth nearly 3 Million because there is said to be 50-60 made. It's crazy the next card that in value is a 1914 Babe Ruth card and its worth 517,000

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Just now, RealBallHawk20 said:

Yup very rare like the card is named up there 1908 T206 Honus Wagner card is worth nearly 3 Million because there is said to be 50-60 made. It's card that the next card in value is a 1914 Babe Ruth card and its worth 517,000

I worked with a guy back in the 90's whose father-in-law had one of the Babe Ruth cards and left it to my friend's son. I don't remember what grade it was, but he told me that the appraisal was in the $500,000 range back then. This was probably '93 or so.

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Just now, VaBeach_Eagle said:

I worked with a guy back in the 90's whose father-in-law had one of the Babe Ruth cards and left it to my friend's son. I don't remember what grade it was, but he told me that the appraisal was in the $500,000 range back then. This was probably '93 or so.

Wow that's insane, there is like 10 rare cards and i believe none are football cards and i wish it had the babe Ruth or the Honus Wagner card .. i would sell in a heart beat

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Yeah, unless I'm sitting on five figures worth of value with my childhood cards (which I'm definitely not, particularly in the condition they're in), the sentimental value will outweigh the monetary value every time.

I had a Walter Payton rookie (or second year card?) which I completely destroyed as a 9-year old because I taped it to my album with scotch tape :facepalm: :lol:

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12 minutes ago, hoosierdaddy said:

Yeah, unless I'm sitting on five figures worth of value with my childhood cards (which I'm definitely not, particularly in the condition they're in), the sentimental value will outweigh the monetary value every time.

I had a Walter Payton rookie (or second year card?) which I completely destroyed as a 9-year old because I taped it to my album with scotch tape :facepalm: :lol:

We used to use them in the spokes of our bikes.

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I collected them for the bubblegum.

Seriously, I enjoyed getting cards of players I liked. Back then, I identified strongly with players. When I played, I WAS Alan Page. I WAS Jack Snow. That's how I felt about them.  I no longer have my old cards though. I'd imagine that my mom threw them out with my comic books.

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That was the original intent of my post. To see if anyone remembered what it was they liked about the football or any sportcards they collected before it turned into a financially driven activity. I remembered meeting Eagles linebacker Harold Wells and when I got home I was so disappointed that there was no football card for him. I found the Eagles team photo from the Bulletin or  Inquirer and confirmed that was who I met. Anybody have one of those old photos? I haven't seen one of those in years.

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I didn't care much for sports cards as a kid. But as a young adult when Ebay first took off I would search for inexpensive, interesting pieces and buy them occasionally. I was and am a huge Mattingly fan and bought some autographed things of his. A hat from his resturaunt, a home plate from Yankee Stadium, etc. I got a whole bunch of cards as well. Nothing really valuable, but always just something that had a unique look to me.

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