NE.Jon

Kaepernick still no job

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On May 18, 2017 at 1:49 PM, voodoochile75 said:

 

Didn't Seattle have Law Enforcement Appreciation Day the day they played the 9ers last year?

Winning.

Law Enforcement Appreciation Day......L.E.A.D.

maybe something a little more softer around the edges...

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On 5/18/2017 at 5:04 PM, EaglesRocker97 said:

Because he exercised his first amendment right, duh!

No, because he's a dope. 

You're right, he exercised his first amendment right, and I'm exercising mine by saying he's a moron for it.

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he worked out with the Seahawks today. I hope they give him a shot. 

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Read this article. 

http://www.miamiherald.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/armando-salguero/article117033883.html

If you are supporting Kaepernick's right to be an NFL QB then you are willfully wrong or ignorant and wrong. There is no other option.

 

I present the photographic evidence to convict this person as a turd with no rights to play in the NFL.

37a3e70300000578-3761560-image-m-16_1472

There is no kneeling in respect of anything. That is sitting and pouting on the bench like an entitled guaranteed contract loser.

 

0901-colin-kaepernick-socks-getty-zoom-3

This is aimed at everyone who has ever worn a police uniform or anyone who respects anyone who has. There is no 'racists only' message on these socks.

 

161127122838-01-colin-kaepernick-malcom-

The man is wearing a Castro shirt with pride. He is a fool and a scumbag. The linked article above gives you full insight into his clueless assertions.

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220px-John_Carlos,_Tommie_Smith,_Peter_N 

 

Kaepernick's form of protest is no different to what these fine Americans did @ the Olympics. While some of the more "moderate" white Kaep detractors might justify Smith and Carlos' form of protest given that period's repressive period, I'm left to wonder how true of a statement this is if we're protesting the same elements of injustices as 40, 50 years ago.

All this talk about patriotism and integrity from people who would've rather a reticent Kaepernick more content with his money than his conscience is really worthless, like a fart in the wind. Y'all are in no position, moral or otherwise, to take the high ground. I know history will judge him favorably, while the duplicitous amongst us will be forced into silence or hypocritical admiration whenever the subject of Kaepernick's protest is broached in the future.

authorashcourageaward.jpg

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44 minutes ago, rstarter said:

...like a fart in the wind.

lol  we can change your name Rfarter:D

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Rstarter,

Slight difference.  Smith and Carlos were the top two in the world at what they did delivering a message that could be heard around the world.

Kap is not the best at his position in the state of California....perhaps not even Santa Clara.

Had he developed into a successful QB he might be remembered differently.  He may have brought more to the discussion. His abstinence from voting, support for dictators, etc really disables his ability to be taken seriously.

Had he put some thought into this, he really could have delivered a powerful message, but I really don't think he had one.

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I think the final straw could have been his praising of Fidel Castro.

Remember Ozzie Guillen? Dude had some controversial views involving racism and had anti LGBT language but still was a well respected manager who was lauded especially for leading the White Sox to their first World Series in forever.

Then in Miami, he heaps some praise onto Fidel. He does this in an area with a high amount of Cuban exiles and descendants of Cuban exiles while being in a sport with a high Cuban American population.

Attendance and ratings dropped to go along with his team not winning.

Ozzie goes from beloved to hated overnight and has been out of MLB ever since.

Many shrugged at Kaep until he threw praise on Fidel right before playing in Miami. It was in that game that son of a Cuban exile Kiko Alonso, drilled Kaep to end the game and afterwards spoke of the "bad blood" he had with Kaep due to his praise of Castro.

Calling the ways of the US oppressive while talking up a guy who made his career out oppressing people to the point that the bottom of the ocean between Cuba and southern Florida is littered with the skeletons of hundreds to possibly thousands of Cubans fleeing Castros regime.

 

It also doesn't help that he didn't do any activism until AFTER he he got benched and he didn't donate a dime until AFTER he got called out for it.

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I am 100% behind Kaepernick's right to protest and use the NFL platform in that cause, especially the non confrontational way he did it..  But I'm still not totally convinced on his black ball status.  He's still caught in no man's land, wanting to be paid like a borderline starter when he clearly is only wanted as a backup.  The controversy is only one of several reasons nobody wanted him as the leader of the team, he's simply never been a good leader on or off the field.

 

Is there blackballing involved?  Absolutely, no doubt, but it's NOT the only reason he's unemployed.  If he'd taken $3m with incentives to play backup he'd have a job by now.

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I don't get what's so hard to understand.  An owner can choose who works for his organization.  In this case, the totality of his performance as a QB and the sideshow that he brings with him are just too much for any team right now.  It doesn't matter if he is better than other players at that position.  The whole picture is what matters with each and every player.

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http://www.bayareasportsguy.com/kaepernick-aldon-smith-nessa-49ers-locker-room-drama/

I heard more on this story from a video, but I can't find the video. Pretty much Kap began sleeping with Alton Smiths gf which lead them to split and kap still kept going with her. 

Crapersnatch is just an a hole through and through. 

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11 hours ago, Vee said:

Rstarter,

Slight difference.  Smith and Carlos were the top two in the world at what they did delivering a message that could be heard around the world.

Kap is not the best at his position in the state of California....perhaps not even Santa Clara.

Had he developed into a successful QB he might be remembered differently.  He may have brought more to the discussion. His abstinence from voting, support for dictators, etc really disables his ability to be taken seriously.

Had he put some thought into this, he really could have delivered a powerful message, but I really don't think he had one.

Slight difference, huh.

Quote

Smith and Carlos were the top two in the world at what they did delivering a message that could be heard around the world.

1) This is revisionist at best, and dishonest at worst. Much of the backlash that resulted from Smith and Carlos' protest was from  leveraging their exposure (as some of the world's best sprinters) towards highlighting the injustices being carried out under the banner of white supremacy. The fact that the "black-skinned storm troopers" refused to be content with their international status (afforded by white America, btw), and instead raised their voices to protest racial injustice, didn't sit well with that segment of the population.

2) If what you say is true, and they were well positioned to use their platform as athletes to raise awareness of the injustices happening in America, how many in white America heard them? If their message fell on receptive ears, then how do we reconcile that with Kaepernick's protest?

3) The platform does not matter. You could be poor and black, and have your concerns for systemic racism disregarded as being misplaced, anachronistic and not at all relevant to your present struggles in America. You could be rich and famous and still have your concerns met with skepticism, as if being rich and famous precludes one from experiencing racism. What matters is the message; it is not so readily consumed by white America.

4) What the F does being good at football have to do with being able to voice opposition to racism. We're more than 400 years into this.  The fact that you discredit Kaepernick's ability to contribute to the fight against systemic racism, using the pretext of his QBing abilities (which I doubt are objective), really tells me where your mind is at.

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2 hours ago, rstarter said:

Slight difference, huh.

1) This is revisionist at best, and dishonest at worst. Much of the backlash that resulted from Smith and Carlos' protest was from  leveraging their exposure (as some of the world's best sprinters) towards highlighting the injustices being carried out under the banner of white supremacy. The fact that the "black-skinned storm troopers" refused to be content with their international status (afforded by white America, btw), and instead raised their voices to protest racial injustice, didn't sit well with that segment of the population.

Revisionist how?  I'm assuming you're addressing my statement, "heard around the world" because that's what you bolded.  They did something that was televised internationally in front of millions of people around the world.  What did I revise.  You're reading something else into this.  If you want to have a discussion, stick with what's being written.

2 hours ago, rstarter said:

2) If what you say is true, and they were well positioned to use their platform as athletes to raise awareness of the injustices happening in America, how many in white America heard them? If their message fell on receptive ears, then how do we reconcile that with Kaepernick's protest?

Millions of white people heard them.  How could you avoid it?  Even if you did not watch the games, it was covered in every media outlet for weeks?  As for receptive ears?  Not so much.  You know how it ended with those two.  Not well.

2 hours ago, rstarter said:

3) The platform does not matter. You could be poor and black, and have your concerns for systemic racism disregarded as being misplaced, anachronistic and not at all relevant to your present struggles in America. You could be rich and famous and still have your concerns met with skepticism, as if being rich and famous precludes one from experiencing racism. What matters is the message; it is not so readily consumed by white America.

I would disagree.  I think the platform does matter.  The messenger can be every bit as important as the message, especially when it involves sensitive subjects.  Without the proper platform, it is much more challenging to get the message across successfully.  Not impossible, I suppose, but definitely more prone to backfires, misunderstandings and misrepresentations.

2 hours ago, rstarter said:

4) What the F does being good at football have to do with being able to voice opposition to racism. We're more than 400 years into this.  The fact that you discredit Kaepernick's ability to contribute to the fight against systemic racism, using the pretext of his QBing abilities (which I doubt are objective), really tells me where your mind is at.

Being good a football has little to do with being able to voice opposition to racism, however I am discrediting Kaps ability to contribute to the fight against systematic racism.  Being a good football player does help create a sense of being a good role model.  Lots of people want to be Tom Brady or Russell Wilson.  No one wants to be Nelson Agholor.  You don't think cultivating a successful leadership role in an NFL franchise can help that person succeed at sending messages?  I'm not saying it's the only way, but it certainly seems like it would be way more successful than Kap's current plan.  We both know that any contract he signs, it's gonna have language to protect the team against more scrutiny.  You think he'd have a little more leverage to not sign that contract if he was better at his position and continue his fight against systematic racism?  

Hes at best an average QB that is below average, almost counterproductive at delivering any productive message against racism.  He will not be judged differently in the future because I suspect he'll be forgotten altogether in a few years.

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On 6/6/2017 at 1:25 PM, rstarter said:

220px-John_Carlos,_Tommie_Smith,_Peter_N 

 

Kaepernick's form of protest is no different to what these fine Americans did @ the Olympics. While some of the more "moderate" white Kaep detractors might justify Smith and Carlos' form of protest given that period's repressive period, I'm left to wonder how true of a statement this is if we're protesting the same elements of injustices as 40, 50 years ago.

All this talk about patriotism and integrity from people who would've rather a reticent Kaepernick more content with his money than his conscience is really worthless, like a fart in the wind. Y'all are in no position, moral or otherwise, to take the high ground. I know history will judge him favorably, while the duplicitous amongst us will be forced into silence or hypocritical admiration whenever the subject of Kaepernick's protest is broached in the future.

authorashcourageaward.jpg

You don't get it at all. Those guys were individual winners on a podium standing in unity for a cause. They were taking their moment of glory and offering it up in support for a worthy cause in the face of scorn. They were like Jackie Robinson or Muhammad Ali.

Kaep is a biceps kissing, Miami dolphin hat wearing, pig sock wearing, Castro shirt wearing a-hole who pouted on his butt before spinning it into something else.

He turned a team sport into 'all about the backup QB' That goes against everything football is about at any level.

Those guys you show above were not getting a guaranteed 10 million to do that.

They did not abandon their stance at the first sign of real financial repercussion.

He is much more Kathy Griffin than Jackie Robinson, but you are too busy flinging poo to notice. We are just reviewing all the facts of the case and making our judgement.

Life is about communication and Kaep is really awful at it.

He is 4-20 in his last 24 games and also highly offensive (socks, Castro) but fools like you think he is owed a job.

If he had turned Super Bowl media day 2013 into discussion on race without insult then he would have been a hero to many and only the Alt-Right crowd would dislike him for it.

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On 6/7/2017 at 10:40 AM, dawkins4prez said:

I am 100% behind Kaepernick's right to protest and use the NFL platform in that cause, especially the non confrontational way he did it..  But I'm still not totally convinced on his black ball status.  He's still caught in no man's land, wanting to be paid like a borderline starter when he clearly is only wanted as a backup.  The controversy is only one of several reasons nobody wanted him as the leader of the team, he's simply never been a good leader on or off the field.

 

Is there blackballing involved?  Absolutely, no doubt, but it's NOT the only reason he's unemployed.  If he'd taken $3m with incentives to play backup he'd have a job by now.

Black balling requires league level conspiracy to keep him unemployed.

There is more chance that Santa Claus is forcing all 32 teams to not hire him then there is of a league memo or secret discussions.

12 teams each deciding not to hire a 4-20 in his last 24 games scumbag is not the same thing.

Jay Cutler is 7-17 in his last 24, why is no one crying Black Ball about him?

Jeff George was 12-12 in his last 24 games with a rocket arm at age 35 and he was pushed out of the league.

Tebow and Michael Sam are not being black balled. Their upside is not worth the downside. Period.

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He looks pretty oppressed  as a kid     and  he even followed his dreams to play for the 49ers ... Yes poor Kaep        

 

 

 

yP9im.png

 

 

 

Image result for kaepernick high school

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Also, Nothing about Kaep looks black ... he cried he was treated differently in School growing up ...  he reminds me of white kids wanting to be

black / ****.  Even his Stlyed haor cut looks bad as he does not have a afro ... looks like he got his hair curled . I think we found his real father btw 

 

Image result for Kaepernick is half white half

 

 

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36 minutes ago, NE.Jon said:

He looks pretty oppressed  as a kid     and  he even followed his dreams to play for the 49ers ... Yes poor Kaep        

 

 

 

yP9im.png

 

 

 

 

Fake news, he wrote that a year before the draft

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