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VaBeach_Eagle

2018 Hard Knocks - The Cleveland Browns

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22 hours ago, Dawkins 20 said:

That seemed to be the trendy stadium design style at the time. Gillette Stadium (Pats), Heinz Field (Steelers), M&T Bank Stadium (Ravens), the Browns Stadium and the Linc all have very similar looking designs.

Yup. I went to Cleveland, Baltimore, and FedEx Field in Washington. They were built in 1999, 1998, and 1997. They are all pretty much the same, enclosed bowls. I think they echo the crowd noise better than the Linc. FedEx Field might be the loudest, it has the steepest upper deck, but the stadium is always half-empty. Really. :lol:  I am surprised they have such a long waitlist for seats because it was a sparse crowd.

Pittsburgh, New England, and Philly opened just a few years later. Similar design but they added more angles and cutouts.

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2 hours ago, toolg said:

Yup. I went to Cleveland, Baltimore, and FedEx Field in Washington. They were built in 1999, 1998, and 1997. They are all pretty much the same, enclosed bowls. I think they echo the crowd noise better than the Linc. FedEx Field might be the loudest, it has the steepest upper deck, but the stadium is always half-empty. Really. :lol:  I am surprised they have such a long waitlist for seats because it was a sparse crowd.

Pittsburgh, New England, and Philly opened just a few years later. Similar design but they added more angles and cutouts.

They dont. That legendary wait list is gone.  Long gone.  Only the lie remained up until mid June of this year.

 

https://deadspin.com/the-sad-history-of-the-skins-bogus-season-ticket-waitin-1826841550

Quote

The Sad History Of The Skins' Bogus Season Ticket Waiting List

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In the least surprising bombshell you’ll read about this week, the Skins have admitted that nobody’s actually waiting for season tickets, despite an alleged waiting list that owner Dan Snyder used to claim had 200,000 people.

I was obsessed with the waiting list for years, mostly because it was so obviously a sham yet was always treated as a real deal by the team and the folks who covered it. The Skins PR staff used to lead off every postgame notes package after a home game, even those played in two thirds–full stadiums, saying the just-played contest was sold out and was continuing a sellout streak that’s been running "since 1966.”

To me, this was the Studio 54 principle at play, based on the premise that nothing attracts a crowd like a crowd. No matter how crowded the Studio 54 was back in the day, bouncers always maintained a line outside the door of folks waiting to get in for all passersby to see. So the Skins lied about the list for years, hoping the illusion of demand would create real demand.

The dirty truth is that the team never sold out even a single game after the 1996 move from RFK Stadium to the hellhole in Landover, Md., that is now called FedExField. I used to go to the ticket window whenever I’d go to a Skins game at FedEx and ask what was available, and 100 percent of the time, even for prime time appearances versus the New York Giants and Dallas Cowboys when those rivalry games mattered in the standings, the clerk behind the window would offer to sell me tickets at face value for seats all around the stadium.

That’s not even counting the 20,000 or so so-called "premium seats,” that Snyder had installed and marketed so aggressively and at silly prices. Snyder needed the illusion of a waiting list for the regular seats to help his sales pitch for the premiums, which went for premium prices. And if people knew there was no waiting list, there would be no place for his money-grubbing gimmicks. The "TailGate Club,” for example, was a grotesque line-jumping scheme that charged fans $1,750 to sign up, plus $540 a head, which got members admission to pre-game buffets of hot dogs and burgers, as well as the right to get ahead of everybody on the fictional waiting list to buy season tickets immediately.

The "Dream Seats” likewise only existed because of the illusion of demand. Snyder installed a few rows of field-level seats immediately after buying the team. At RFK, the lower rows were considered the worst seats in the house because you couldn’t see over the players on the sidelines, but Snyder was charging $3,000 per seat for a season with that view. "Unless you dream of Bruce Smith’s a**,” a buddy of mine told me in 2000, "those ain’t dream seats.”

And yes, those willing to shell out the enormous bucks for these **** seats were told they could skip the waiting list.

Of course, there was actually a time when football tickets were precious around these parts and waiting was the hardest part of being a Skins fan. The boom started in the mid-1960s, not long after after the Skins moved from Griffith Stadium to D.C. Stadium. Games started selling out in 1966, and the first mention I could find of a waiting list came in 1971, when the team said 5,000 folks wanted season tickets but none were available. A team official told the Washington Post that only 23 season tickets became available because of non-renewals after the 1971 season. The Skins made their first Super Bowl appearance the following season, after which team president Edward Bennett Williams said 7,500 names were on the list. In the spring of 1974, during Congressional hearings debating the NFL’s "blackout rule” which required sold-out games to be televised, the Postreported that the list had grown to "more than 10,000” names. In February 1975, the paper put the waiting list at 12,000 names, and it showed very little growth over the next decade. A report in July 1987 had the Skins claiming 15,000 people were on it.

A year later, after Joe Gibbs’s second Super Bowl win and as talk about building a stadium to replace RFK commenced, the list’s size skyrocketed but grew more precise, with the team saying 38,094 fans were in wait. Around this time, stories about Skins season ticket disputes showing up in inheritance struggles and divorce decrees become commonplace in the D.C. area.

Robin Ficker was among those tired of being shut out. Ficker, a Maryland attorney and D.C. area legend for his political gadfly tactics and heckling at Washington Bullets games, sued the Skins in D.C. Superior Court in 1990 over the waiting list. Ficker had gotten his name on the waiting list in the early 1970s. Back then, you could send a self-addressed stamped envelope to the Skins offices to check your progress on the list after each season. Though with Skins tickets going for $49 for a whole seven-game season slate, that was a depressing exercise at the time. After 18 years on the list and finding himself stuck at No. 134, having moved up only 10 places in the previous five years, Ficker decided to take legal action.

"I found out a judge I knew got tickets without even being on the list,” Ficker recalls. So he sued, alleging the team was violating its contract with him by not taking names in order.

"Being honest with the fans is just as important as winning the Super Bowl,” Ficker told the Washington Times after the filing. The case got tossed by a judge who’d ruled Ficker didn’t prove that the team promised him to abide by the list. The squeaky wheel got some grease, however: The Skins offered Ficker the season tickets he craved a year after beating him in court.

Wins and new stadium rumors continued, and the list grew: By July 1992, months after the Skins whupped the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXVI, the Post reported that the team claimed "about 45,506” ticketless fans wanted their shot. Owner Jack Kent Cooke, while making his pitch to area governments to find the best location for his next stadium, boasted that the waiting list had grown to "about 50,000.” He got Prince George’s County, Md., to let him build there in part by agreeing to give the first 2,000 county residents on the list the right to buy season tickets. The opening of Jack Kent Cooke Stadium in September 1997, soon to be the biggest stadium in the NFL with more than 20,000 more seats than RFK held, caused the list to shrink a bit, as reports put the list at 45,000 names. When Snyder was approved by the NFL as owner in May 1999, a Post report had the list at 40,000.

The Skins have habitually lost under Snyder, and dissatisfaction with his ownership and the game-day experience was huge from the start. Yet for years he claimed that demand for his lousy, unlikeable product was growing. In March 2000, the Post reported that the list was growing again, to "about 45,000.” By January 2001, that figure swelled to "about 50,000.” In May 2002, at the beginning of the woe-filled Steve Spurrier Era and with broadcasts showing huge swaths of empty yellow and red seats, Snyder told the Washington Times the waiting list was at 75,000 names. When Spurrier ran away and Snyder threw big bucks at Joe Gibbs to return as head coach in January 2004, the team claimed for the first time that more than 100,000 fans were waiting for tickets.

In November 2006, the Times said the Skins claimed more than 150,000 names on the waiting list. In April 2008, with Gibbs gone again, years of games at FedExField where the opposition’s fan base was louder than and at least as large as the home team’s flock, and with the hiring of Jim Zorn as head coach engendering amazing amounts of hopelessness, Snyder went full Pinocchio, telling the Times: "Our waiting list is over 200,000.”

The team’s miseries only spiraled in recent years, but the organization stuck to that crazy number—even as the sales tactics got more desperate. A direct mail campaign from April 2009 told target customers there were "over 200,000 fans on the waitlist behind you.” But by the end of that year, Snyder was offering Christmas gift packages that included standard tickets to the Dallas Cowboys game, a tacit admission that those seats hadn’t ever been sold. There were other clear signs of trouble in Skins ticketland: Several of the team’s season ticket–sellers sued Snyder in 2009 for $185,000 in back overtime pay. If the lines to buy Skins tickets were indeed as long and organized as the team constantly claimed, why would they even need a large ticket-selling staff, let alone a staff working scads of OT? (The Skins were eventually ordered by an arbitrator to pay off the plaintiffs.)

Through the years, the Skins always had help from beat reporters willing to push the waiting list myth. This one from the Virginian Pilot in 2007, headlined "Redskins fans gobbling up extravagant season tickets,” is a classic of the lap-dog genre. The lede:

How badly do you want Redskins tickets? The team’s famous, years-long waiting list remains. However, fans have the rare opportunity to sink their credit card into seats at FedEx Field this fall - for a price.

Ficker says the magic wore off for him early in the Snyder Era. The last straw was Snyder’s big splash signing of high-priced, do-nothing defensive tackle Albert Haynesworth in 2009. Before Haynesworth even played a down in burgundy and gold, Ficker voluntarily turned in the season tickets he’d once sued to get. He says he hasn’t ever regretted the decision.

"I really wanted the tickets for years!” he says. "But my interest and enjoyment just waned, and when I gave them up, they spent years trying to get me back, and I’m thinking, if there really was anybody waiting, why would they even try to get me back? I came to realize they were just saying there was a waiting list to create demand, like they had a hard thing to get. It’s not a hard thing to get.”

No, it’s not. The team’s announcement yesterday said that season tickets are as of now "immediately available to all Redskins fans.” So Snyder acknowledged that supply had indeed been kicking demand’s a** all these years. Get in line.

 

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5 minutes ago, paco said:
Quote

The dirty truth is that the team never sold out even a single game after the 1996 move from RFK Stadium

I believe that.

Also FedEx Field is the worst experience of the newer stadiums. It is outside the city, a mile walk from the nearest public transportation, the closest attraction is a suburban shopping mall. So you have to drive in, park, then fight the traffic out and drive somewhere to do anything worthwhile after the game.

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1 minute ago, toolg said:

I believe that.

Also FedEx Field is the worst experience of the newer stadiums. It is outside the city, a mile walk from the nearest public transportation, the closest attraction is a suburban shopping mall. So you have to drive in, park, then fight the traffic out and drive somewhere to do anything worthwhile after the game.

Oh, I know.  It's awful.

 

Even if you do the subway thing and walk, do they still charge you for that shuttle for "safety reasons"?   (The virus has spread, the falcons are adopting that same policy with their new stadium)

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3 minutes ago, paco said:

Even if you do the subway thing and walk, do they still charge you for that shuttle for "safety reasons"?   (The virus has spread, the falcons are adopting that same policy with their new stadium)

Yikes. I drove, so I don't know if FedEx Field shuttles to Metro....  When I go to DC I'll just drive to a station along the beltway and park there (Either Greenbelt-green or New Carrolton-orange). FedEx Field is on the next subway line down, so I just drove and parked there.

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3 hours ago, toolg said:

I believe that.

Also FedEx Field is the worst experience of the newer stadiums. It is outside the city, a mile walk from the nearest public transportation, the closest attraction is a suburban shopping mall. So you have to drive in, park, then fight the traffic out and drive somewhere to do anything worthwhile after the game.

The stadium is basically in the back playground of the elementary school that I went to in the 70's.

If the mall that you're speaking of is Landover Mall, it's gone. It was demolished about 10 years ago. I used to love going there around Christmas time to see all of the decorations that they put out.

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23 minutes ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

The stadium is basically in the back playground of the elementary school that I went to in the 70's.

If the mall that you're speaking of is Landover Mall, it's gone. It was demolished about 10 years ago. I used to love going there around Christmas time to see all of the decorations that they put out.

I am sure it was 10+ years ago... I remember arriving early for a night game, eating dinner at one of the chain restaurants (TGI Fridays or something similar), then going over to the stadium. It was too early in the season for xmas decorations. Nice weather, warm for a night game. Eagles lost.

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25 minutes ago, toolg said:

I am sure it was 10+ years ago... I remember arriving early for a night game, eating dinner at one of the chain restaurants (TGI Fridays or something similar), then going over to the stadium. It was too early in the season for xmas decorations. Nice weather, warm for a night game. Eagles lost.

If the mall was just minutes away from the stadium, that would most likely be Landover Mall, which was just off 495.

In this picture you can see where the mall was, and where FedEx Field is. The elementary school that I went to is directly under the word 'Prince'. Also, if you see where it says 'Palmer Park', under that is the neighborhood where Sugar Ray Leonard grew up.

I don't know if they were still doing the decorations in the mall like they did in the 70s. It was great, with all kinds of animated characters all over the mall on both levels. For a little child (under 8), it was a magical wonderland of Christmas lol.

Landover.JPG.7671831652427de689227c7d7a47358a.JPG

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6 hours ago, toolg said:

I believe that.

Also FedEx Field is the worst experience of the newer stadiums. It is outside the city, a mile walk from the nearest public transportation, the closest attraction is a suburban shopping mall. So you have to drive in, park, then fight the traffic out and drive somewhere to do anything worthwhile after the game.

Giants stadium is in a terrible location as well, in fact most NFL stadiums I’ve been to are in the middle of no where. I mean, what the hell is there to do in South Philly after a game? Chickie & Pete’s? That place sucks. Public transportation is terrible. The best thing to do after visiting a stadium in Philly is get the hell out of there as soon as possible. 

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Just now, BKLYNYG said:

Giants stadium  is in a terrible location as well...

Well, seeing as they demolished the place a few years ago, I would assume that a landfill is a terrible location.

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34 minutes ago, BKLYNYG said:

Giants stadium is in a terrible location as well, in fact most NFL stadiums I’ve been to are in the middle of no where. I mean, what the hell is there to do in South Philly after a game? Chickie & Pete’s? That place sucks. Public transportation is terrible. The best thing to do after visiting a stadium in Philly is get the hell out of there as soon as possible. 

:lol: :lol: 

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3 hours ago, toolg said:

It was too early in the season for xmas decorations.

Since I mentioned it, I searched and was surprised to find a couple if pictures of how they used to do it. This is how the entire mall was decorated, back in the day. (These pictures are from 1972).

4032515346_6d1a5989f0_b.thumb.jpg.a8b97fc3f90560d3d89684ea9b3f204b.jpg

 

4031762103_ea81b939d4_b.thumb.jpg.085251a4aa7a1cef812cdc5e4c814773.jpg

 

4031763195_4f7fde3b54_b.thumb.jpg.2846f96917c0dca953a4419d4565c4da.jpg

 

4032517198_e1de9379ec_b.thumb.jpg.b6f9f87a48b8f8d1a019436fa7bb128b.jpg

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22 hours ago, BKLYNYG said:

Giants stadium is in a terrible location as well, in fact most NFL stadiums I’ve been to are in the middle of no where. I mean, what the hell is there to do in South Philly after a game? Chickie & Pete’s? That place sucks. Public transportation is terrible. The best thing to do after visiting a stadium in Philly is get the hell out of there as soon as possible. 

I haven't been yet but isnt Xfinity Live open after games for something to do?

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On 8/10/2018 at 7:54 AM, paco said:

They dont. That legendary wait list is gone.  Long gone.  Only the lie remained up until mid June of this year.

 

https://deadspin.com/the-sad-history-of-the-skins-bogus-season-ticket-waitin-1826841550

 

Great read.  I love the story about the ticket sellers sueing snider for back OT pay.  Snider, telling everyone there is a 200,000 person waiting list for season tickets and at the same time having ticket sellers working overtime.  Then not paying them!!

i swear he is the biggest turd in the NFL.  And that’s one heck of an accomplishement. 

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27 minutes ago, SNOORDA said:

i swear he is the biggest turd in the NFL.  

Two of my brothers are Redskins fans, and they wholeheartedly agree.

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20 minutes ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Two of my brothers are Redskins fans, and they wholeheartedly agree.

I’m sorry to hear that...

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Just now, SNOORDA said:

I’m sorry to hear that...

I grew up just outside of D.C., so I was really the Green Sheep of the family lol. My oldest brother is a Raiders fan. Super Bowl XV was no fun, not just because we lost, but we lost to the Raiders!

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Anyone that doesn't have HBO, but you can make a virtual credit card (like I've mentioned in the past), just make a virtual card with a $1 limit, then go sign up for a free preview of Hulu and add Live TV, DVR, HBO... the works. Take everything they'll give you. When a week is up, they'll try to charge you and since there's a $1 limit, the charge will fail.

Next week, do the same, using a different email address and a new virtual card.

You could do this to get free TV for as long as you wanted to have it, you'd just have to make 52 email addresses, one for each week of the year, and 52 virtual credit cards. But it would work as long as they're offering free previews.

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1 hour ago, Agent23 said:

Or you can go to nfl.com and watch the hard knocks episodes for free 

I just went an looked and don't see where the episodes are. I didn't look too hard, but I looked a little.  Where are they hiding them? I'll watch some of the old season.

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This is going to end well

Quote

Baker Mayfield is showing off his new underwear line with a tiger and a Rolls-Royce

BBMeaN2.img?h=450&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

Browns quarterback Baker Mayfield is quickly adjusting to NFL stardom, and he’s doing so in some new underwear — with a tiger by his side.

 

Excited to announce my partnership with @PSDunderwear! Giving away 500 free pairs today. Tiger not included . Give them a follow and shop my collection! https://t.co/Xy4RsMtas1pic.twitter.com/6lt56PeWjw

— Baker Mayfield (@bakermayfield) August 21, 2018

 

There’s a lot to take in here. What’s the story here? Did Mayfield decide to take his tiger for a drive in his Rolls-Royce and end up in an industrial park outside of Cleveland? I don’t really care that much because PSD sells these underwear.

 

a close up of a bag© Provided by Vox Media, Inc.

 

The company is owned by Kyrie Irving, Jimmy Butler, Chandler Parsons and Marshawn Lynch. They seem to have the market corned on wolf-themed briefs, and now they’re launching a specific Baker Mayfield line.

So if you’ve ever wanted to wear Mayfield’s jersey on your crotch, now’s the chance.

BBMedat.img?h=799&w=799&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f

 

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The Browns have an offensive line coach who doesn't believe in stretching.

Todd Haley looks around every episode thinking to himself, "We can't win with any of these coaches."

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1 hour ago, SBorBust said:

The Browns have an offensive line coach who doesn't believe in stretching.

Todd Haley looks around every episode thinking to himself, "We can't win with any of these coaches."

That guy looks like Andy in about 15 years lol

I've been wondering why Kendricks hasn't been on in any of the first 3 episodes, looks like he'll be featured next week.

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