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Hall of Fame reveals finalists for Class of 2019

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Hall of Fame reveals finalists for Class of 2019

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001007514/article/hall-of-fame-reveals-finalists-for-class-of-2019

The Pro Football Hall of Fame unveiled its 15 modern-era finalists for the Class of 2019 on Thursday.

These finalists were among a group of 92 players and 11 coaches that were initially named nominees for this year's class in September.

FINALISTS

Tony Gonzalez, TE -- 1997-2008 Kansas City Chiefs, 2009-2013 Atlanta Falcons

Isaac Bruce, WR -- 1994-2007 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 2008-09 San Francisco 49ers

Edgerrin James, RB -- 1999-2005 Indianapolis Colts, 2006-08 Arizona Cardinals, 2009 Seattle Seahawks

Ed Reed, FS -- 2002-2012 Baltimore Ravens, 2013 New York Jets, 2013 Houston Texans

Steve Atwater, S -- 1989-1998 Denver Broncos, 1999 New York Jets

Champ Bailey, CB -- 1999-2003 Washington Redskins, 2004-2013 Denver Broncos

Ty Law, CB --1995-2004 New England Patriots, 2005, 2008 New York Jets, 2006-07 Kansas City Chiefs, 2009 Denver Broncos

John Lynch, FS -- 1993-2003 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-07 Denver Broncos

Tony Boselli, T -- 1995-2001 Jacksonville Jaguars, 2002 Houston Texans (injured reserve)

Steve Hutchinson, G --2001-05 Seattle Seahawks, 2006-2011 Minnesota Vikings, 2012 Tennessee Titans

Alan Faneca, G -- 1998-2007 Pittsburgh Steelers, 2008-09 New York Jets, 2010 Arizona Cardinals

Kevin Mawae, C/G -- 1994-97 Seattle Seahawks, 1998-2005 New York Jets, 2006-09 Tennessee Titans

Richard Seymour, DE/DT -- 2001-08 New England Patriots, 2009-2012 Oakland Raiders

Don Coryell, Coach -- 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers

Tom Flores, Coach -- 1979-1987 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-94 Seattle Seahawks

The list of finalists includes the recommended nominees of the Hall of Fame's Contributors and Seniors Committees. The 2019 contributor finalists are Pat Bowlen (Owner -- 1984-Present Denver Broncos) and Gil Brandt (Vice President of Player Personnel -- 1960-1988 Dallas Cowboys; Contributor -- 1995-present at NFL.com). The senior finalist is Johnny Robinson (Safety -- 1960-1971 Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs).

The selection committee will meet on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019, in Atlanta to elect the Class of 2019. While there is no set number for any class of enshrinees, the selection process by-laws provide that between four and eight new members will be selected.

The senior finalist and contributor finalists are voted "yes" or "no" for election at the annual selection meeting and must receive at least 80 percent support from the committee to be elected.

The modern-era finalists will be trimmed during the meeting from 15 to 10 and then from 10 to 5. The remaining five finalists will be voted on individually, "yes" or "no" and must receive the same 80 percent positive vote as the Senior and Contributors Finalists to earn election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The Class of 2019 will be revealed during "NFL Honors" the night before Super Bowl LIII on Feb. 2 at 9 p.m. ET on CBS.

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34 minutes ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Don Coryell deserves to be in.

Even though he was a great offensive innovator and coached some great offenses (and also was a mentor for one of the all-time great NFL coaches, Joe Gibbs), Coryell never coached his team to a Super Bowl appearance, much less a Super Bowl win.  I think he only ever won 3 playoff games in his coaching career.

If someone were to induct an offensive innovator into the Pro Football HOF, the guy who should be (and actually already is) inducted is Sid Gillman, who influenced both branches of the West Coast offense - the deep, vertical passing game with a single back formation (Coryell, Gibbs, Al Davis) and the short, ball control passing game (Bill Walsh and his coaching descendants).  Gillman also had a reasonably good head coaching career with the Rams, Chargers, and Oilers.

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1 hour ago, TheGodfather said:

Gonzalez, Bruce, Reed, Bailey are slam dunks. What a class

Crazy Tony G stat:

 

He played in the NFL from 1997 to 2013 and during that time he had only 6 fumbles.

 

That in a vacuum is impressive.  What is more impressive is if you consider that the had 3 of them in 1998 and 2 in 1999.  Which means he had 5 fumbles in his first 3 years and then only 1 in his final 14 years.

 

:worthy:

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Just now, CHIP72 said:

Even though he was a great offensive innovator and coached some great offenses (and also was a mentor for one of the all-time great NFL coaches, Joe Gibbs), Coryell never coached his team to a Super Bowl appearance, much less a Super Bowl win.  I think he only ever won 3 playoff games in his coaching career.

If someone were to induct an offensive innovator into the Pro Football HOF, the guy who should be (and actually already is) inducted is Sid Gillman, who influenced both branches of the West Coast offense - the deep, vertical passing game with a single back formation (Coryell, Gibbs, Al Davis) and the short, ball control passing game (Bill Walsh and his coaching descendants).  Gillman also had a reasonably good head coaching career with the Rams, Chargers, and Oilers.

The Hall of Fame isn't about Super Bowl wins. If it was, Dan Marino and Jim Kelly wouldn't be in. You know who else wouldn't be in? His very own QB, Dan Fouts (who has the same win-loss record in the post season as Coryell).

Your first sentence though, is why he should be in. He was a 'great offensive innovator'.

I've often heard the Hall of Fame director say that the first question that is posed to the voters is this: "Can you tell the story of the NFL without _________________?" (insert name)

As you just said, he was a great offensive innovator. He innovated the way the game is played. So the answer to that question should be "No, you can't."

To your point that Coryell was influenced by Gillman, why does that matter? That's like saying that the Beatles don't deserve to be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame because they were influenced by Elvis. Their career stands on its own. Coryell's career stands on its own. That said, I stand by what I said. He deserves to be in.

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No love for Ed Reed?  He wasn’t the all around safety or hitter that Dawk was, but the dude was an absolute ballhawk - felt like every INT he made he returned for a TD

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21 minutes ago, mikemack8 said:

No love for Ed Reed?  He wasn’t the all around safety or hitter that Dawk was, but the dude was an absolute ballhawk - felt like every INT he made he returned for a TD

I'm biased, so I admit that my answer is thusly biased, but he shouldn't get in this year. If Brian Dawkins wasn't worth being first ballot, then Reed shouldn't be either.

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3 hours ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Don Coryell deserves to be in.

14 seasons and 0 Super Bowl appearances just can't get a coach into Canton no matter what. No matter how great of an innovator you are, you have to prove yourself capable of winning in championship situations to be counted among the greatest.

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2 hours ago, gordon said:

14 seasons and 0 Super Bowl appearances just can't get a coach into Canton no matter what. No matter how great of an innovator you are, you have to prove yourself capable of winning in championship situations to be counted among the greatest.

But 15 years with 0 Super Bowl appearances got Dan Fouts in. Not knowing how old you are and what you may have knowledge of, Dan Fouts was Don Coryell's QB for almost Don's entire coaching career in San Diego. I say 'almost' because Johnny Unitas was there for the first 6 or 7 games of his first year as coach.

Your opinion is that Super Bowl appearances matter, mine is that in some cases, it shouldn't. I watched a lot of the Chargers back in the late 70's and early to mid 80's. The man deserves to be in, in my opinion. Super Bowl appearances or not.

He may or may not get in, but I still think he should either way.

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10 hours ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

The Hall of Fame isn't about Super Bowl wins. If it was, Dan Marino and Jim Kelly wouldn't be in. You know who else wouldn't be in? His very own QB, Dan Fouts (who has the same win-loss record in the post season as Coryell).

Your first sentence though, is why he should be in. He was a 'great offensive innovator'.

I've often heard the Hall of Fame director say that the first question that is posed to the voters is this: "Can you tell the story of the NFL without _________________?" (insert name)

As you just said, he was a great offensive innovator. He innovated the way the game is played. So the answer to that question should be "No, you can't."

To your point that Coryell was influenced by Gillman, why does that matter? That's like saying that the Beatles don't deserve to be in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame because they were influenced by Elvis. Their career stands on its own. Coryell's career stands on its own. That said, I stand by what I said. He deserves to be in.

Players and coaches are appropriately judged by different standards.  Players can have great statistics, or in the case of offensive linemen, have a great reputation (as exhibited by All-Pro selections), and still be on teams that aren't successful because the team around them isn't good enough, or because they have to compete against even better teams that prevent them from having more team success.  To use Dan Fouts and Dan Marino as examples, with both of them their team's defenses weren't very good for most or all of their prime years, and that made it much harder for their teams to be highly successful.  (Having said that, I do agree quarterbacks play a bigger role than other players on their teams' success, and Fouts in particular has a somewhat shaky argument for the HOF, based on the fact that for a couple years the Chargers' defenses were still reasonably good and San Diego lost a couple of home playoff games during those years, one of which when their offense was held under 20 points.)  By contrast, coaches' "statistics" are their teams' win-loss record.  If a coach's statistics are not good, he ends up not coaching his team anymore because his team isn't winning enough.  That's particularly true in the NFL relative to other levels of football because the disparity in talent between teams is much smaller than at the lower levels of the sport.

As for the innovator angle, that's a subjective thing; one could arguably find football or sports innovation in many, many different places.  Coaches aren't ultimately judged by how innovative they are however, they are judged by how successful their teams are.  I'm willing, and more importantly the Pro Football HOF selectors are willing, to make exceptions for guys who are considered by almost everyone to be highly influential.  That's why Don Coryell is a candidate to begin with; most other coaches with similar levels of success, like Dennis Green (similar number of games coached, slightly worse win-loss record percentage-wise, a 4-8 playoff record compared to 3-6 for Coryell), are not considered HOF candidates.  The problem with Coryell's candidacy, and the reason why I brought up Sid Gillman, is that Coryell was highly influenced by Gillman, and Gillman was most recognized in his coaching career as being an innovator.  (Coryell never coached with Gillman, but coached at San Diego State when Gillman was coaching the San Diego Chargers, and he and his team would attend the Chargers' practices to see Gillman's offensive system in action.)  Additionally, though Gillman was not one of the greatest pro football coaches of all-time record-wise, he did coach his teams to one league title (the San Diego Chargers won the 1963 AFL championship) and five other division championships/league championship game appearances (1955 with the NFL Rams and 1960, 1961, 1964, and 1965 with the AFL Chargers).  You still have to have a reasonably high level of success as a coach to make the Pro Football HOF as an innovator, and IMO Coryell (who I have high respect for; the Air Coryell Chargers were probably the most interesting team in the NFL and one of the highest-profile teams when I started following the NFL) doesn't quite meet that threshold in terms of his teams' success with the Cardinals and Chargers.

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13 hours ago, downundermike said:

No love for Boselli 

His career was about 5 seasons of actually-played snaps. Literally no shot

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18 hours ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Don Coryell deserves to be in.

i’m with you

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Gonzalez is a no brainer first ballot. I also think that Reed and Bailey are first ballot guys as well, but then you see someone like Dawkins not get in on the first try and I also thought Ty Law should be in, so maybe they end up waiting as well for some weird reason.

After that though, I don't see Lynch getting in nor Boselli. Lynch was never in the class of guys like Dawkins, Reed, and Polamalu. If Isaac Bruce doesn't get in soon, he may never get in with the swarm of WR in todays NFL he'll be competing against. Boselli was good, but there have been lots of good and great tackles who also played longer.

I can see Edge finally getting in. He's top 15 all-time currently in scrimmage yards with 91 TDs to boot and was a complete back during his tenure. He'll get leap frogged by Pederson if he plays another season and potentially McCoy as well. He was near the top of the NFL for a few seasons and produced consistently throughout his career until age 30 hit and he dropped off like most RBs.

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Reed is definitely getting first ballot because he was the "sexy" safety. Made a ton of flashy sportscenter plays. 

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On 1/5/2019 at 8:56 AM, BDAWK_4EVER said:

Reed is definitely getting first ballot because he was the "sexy" safety. Made a ton of flashy sportscenter plays. 

He was definitely the best ballhawk of any safety of his era. Dawk was the best overall safety 

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