DeathByEagle

AAF Officially Dead , 2 weeks before end of season.

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On 4/2/2019 at 2:03 PM, UK_EaglesFan89 said:

Well... I guess that helps the XFL? But more likely shows there's no market for football at this time of year. 

XFL is gonna bomb again too. No one wants to watch wanna be or has beens in some junk league that is being played while basketball, hockey and college basketball are in their playoffs. Baseball just started and it's getting nice out people don't want to be inside watching half arse football. 

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Good effort, but the NFL and College Football has cornered the market. The Arena league was a good niche too

People talk about not getting enough football, but I highly doubt that the NFL would have as much viewership if games continued through April.

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AAF player says his personal credit card was charged for stay at team hotel

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https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2019/04/04/aaf-player-says-his-personal-credit-card-was-charged-for-stay-at-team-hotel/

We’re continuing to see evidence that when the Alliance of American Football pulled the plug on its season this week, it did so in a slipshod manner.

The latest comes from Adrien Robinson, a former Giants tight end who was trying to get back into pro football by playing for the Memphis Express this season. Robinson wrote on Twitter that his personal credit card, which he presumably gave the front desk for incidental charges, was charged $2,500 for his stay in the team hotel, and the team has given him no indication that they’ll take care of the matter.

"I woke up to over a $2500 charge pending on my account from the Sonesta hotel our team stayed in,” Robinson wrote. "I called the bank and Memphis team president. My only option is to dispute the charges on Monday. The same thing happened to other players on our team.”

It’s one thing for AAF chairman Tom Dundon to decide he couldn’t afford to keep subsidizing a money-losing league any longer. It’s another thing to treat employees in such a shabby way, as we’ve been hearing all day examples of players being left in the lurch after the league folded. The AAF’s players deserved better.

 

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Bill Polian admits "hiccups” in AAF’s last days: "A lot of it was unacceptable”

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https://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2019/04/05/bill-polian-admits-hiccups-in-aafs-last-days-a-lot-of-it-was-unacceptable/

Amid reports of players being kicked out of their team-issued housing and stuck with charges on their personal credit cards that the teams were supposed to cover, the Alliance of American Football has taken a lot of criticism in recent days. AAF co-founder Bill Polian admits some of that criticism is warranted.

Polian said on SiriusXM NFL Radio that there were a lot of problems that came up when AAF chairman Tom Dundon decided to pull the plug, and that they’re in the process of fixing those problems.

"We had lots of hiccups,” Polian said. "It came so quickly — some of it was a little bit expected but a lot of it was unacceptable. But we’ve rectified that and I’m glad to see that’s been done. Myself and many of the GMs, even though we’re not on the payroll, we’ve been working all day to try and rectify those problems.”

Polian said he’s no longer getting paid by Dundon but will still try to help players and coaches with any remaining problems.

"I’m no longer employed, like most of the football people — we’re all out of work,” Polian said. "I’ve been doing what I can over the last couple days to help everybody get situated as best I can.”

Polian seems to be suggesting that Dundon is the one who dropped the ball, but it’s also fair to question why Polian and co-founder Charlie Ebersol didn’t have a better plan in place for the AAF, which needed Dundon to swoop in and save it early in the season, and then fell apart as soon as Dundon decided he had lost enough money.

 

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https://aaf.com/live/GkR2WgCT3P8yhlVLUJkrcj9zm6ae

This week, we made the difficult decision to suspend all football operations for the Alliance of American Football. We understand the difficulty that this decision has caused for many people and for that we are very sorry. This is not the way we wanted it to end, but we are also committed to working on solutions for all outstanding issues to the best of our ability. Due to ongoing legal processes, we are unable to comment further or share details about the decision.

We are grateful to our players, who delivered quality football and may now exercise their NFL-out clauses in our contract. We encourage them to continue pursuing their dreams and wish them the best. We are grateful to our fans, who have been true believers from the beginning, and to our world-class partners. And to the Alliance coaches and employees who devoted their valuable time and considerable talent to this venture, we are forever grateful.our players, who delivered quality football and may now exercise their NFL-out clauses in our contract. We encourage them to continue pursuing their dreams and wish them the best. We are grateful to our fans, who have been true believers from the beginning, and to our world-class partners. And to the Alliance coaches and employees who devoted their valuable time and considerable talent to this venture, we are forever grateful.

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Until the NFL creates an official "Minor League" system that provides a legitimate developmental path to the NFL, these other leagues will continue to fail. It seems like not having the NFL affiliation just dooms them to generating insufficient revenue.

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On 4/3/2019 at 7:28 PM, ShakeThatMonkey said:

People talk about not getting enough football, but I highly doubt that the NFL would have as much viewership if games continued through April.

Absence makes the heart grow fonder . . . 

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2 hours ago, PoconoDon said:

Until the NFL creates an official "Minor League" system that provides a legitimate developmental path to the NFL, these other leagues will continue to fail. It seems like not having the NFL affiliation just dooms them to generating insufficient revenue.

I can understand the Capitalist Pigs who want to 'test the water' and see if there's a market for this . . . or not.

But there is such a thing as 'saturation' and pro football may have finally reached that point. Whomever is the

money-man of that operation either ran out of money or realized that the potential returns would require more

time & investment than he was willing to make. Today's NFL and all it's followers wasn't created overnight. In

fact it happened over a period of 50 years or so, not in one.   Here's a 'thumb-nail' history of the NFL:

Jump to search

The National Football League (NFL) was founded in 1920 as the American Professional Football Association (APFA) with ten teams from four states, all of whom existed in some form as participants of regional leagues in their respective territories; it took on its current name in 1922. The NFL was the first professional football league to successfully establish a nationwide presence, after several decades of failed attempts. Only two teams currently in the NFL, the Decatur Staleys (now the Chicago Bears) and the Chicago Cardinals (now the Arizona Cardinals), are founding members.[1]The Green Bay Acme Packers, founded in 1919 (joined the NFL in 1921, now the Green Bay Packers) are the oldest NFL franchise within continuous operation in the same location.

League membership gradually stabilized throughout the 1920s and 1930s as the league adopted progressively more formal organization. The first official championship game was held in 1933. The NFL stopped signing black players in 1927 but reintegrated in 1946 following World War II. Other changes followed after the war; the office of league President evolved into the more powerful Commissioner post, mirroring a similar move in Major League Baseball. Teams became more financially viable, the last team folding in 1952 and the league absorbing teams from the briefly more successful All-America Football Conference in 1950, two of which survive to the present day. By 1958, when that season's NFL championship game became known as "The Greatest Game Ever Played", the NFL was on its way to becoming one of the most popular sports leagues in the United States.

The rival American Football League was founded in 1960. It was very successful, and forced a merger with the older NFL that resulted in a greatly expanded league and the creation of the Super Bowl, which has become the most-watched annual sporting event in the United States. The league continued to expand to its current size of 32 teams. A series of labor agreements during the 1990s and increasingly large television contracts have helped keep the league one of the most profitable in the U.S., and the only major league in the U.S. since 1990 to avoid a work stoppage that resulted in the loss of regular-season games.

 

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4 hours ago, PoconoDon said:

Until the NFL creates an official "Minor League" system that provides a legitimate developmental path to the NFL, these other leagues will continue to fail. It seems like not having the NFL affiliation just dooms them to generating insufficient revenue.

They already did that with the WLAF. It lasted 15 or 16 years before the NFL pulled the plug.

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On 4/3/2019 at 12:18 PM, EagleJoe8 said:

Vince was behind the XFL before and it lasted one season. If he tries to make it a gimmick league like he did before, it’ll fail again. 

This is going to be a MUCH more conventional league than the first time in 2001.  McMahon learned a lot from it. 

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3 hours ago, Wallyhorse said:

This is going to be a MUCH more conventional league than the first time in 2001.  McMahon learned a lot from it. 

Still going to be a knock off football league in spring when a ton of other things are going on

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Ex-employees file class-action suits vs. AAF

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http://www.espn.com/espn/story/_/id/26492304/ex-employees-file-class-action-suits-vs-aaf

Two class-action lawsuits have been filed this week by former employees of the Alliance of American Football -- one by players and another by the former Birmingham Iron director of community relations -- after the league's abrupt suspension of operations on April 2.

Both were filed in California. The players' suit was filed in the Superior Court of the State of California, and James Earnest Roberson Jr.'s suit was filed in the U.S. District Court Northern District of California. Both are suing the AAF, although the individuals sued in each one are different.

Roberson is suing the AAF and its LLC, Legendary Field Exhibitions, along with a handful of investors, including former NFL player Jared Allen, who also worked for the Alliance. League co-founder Bill Polian, MGM Resorts International, Troy Polamalu and J.K. McKay also are listed as co-defendants.

The players' lawsuit, filed by Colton Schmidt and Reggie Northrup, is suing the league under the name AAF Players, along with Legendary Field Exhibitions, league owner Tom Dundon, league co-founder Charlie Ebersol and the Ebersol Sports Media Group.

"This is a wholesale destruction of an entire football league," said Boris Treyzon, one of the attorneys suing on behalf of the players. "Once we started looking at the facts, we saw that this is basically a wholesale betrayal of a group of people."

Treyzon said Schmidt and Northrup are the only players named for now, but others have expressed interest in joining. Treyzon said he has yet to communicate with the league, and he declined to offer other specifics.

The Schmidt-Northrup suit is alleging breach of contract by the AAF, breach of implied good faith and fair dealings, failure to pay wages and fraud and false promises.

The suit alleges the "defendants concealed and suppressed a material fact about their intentions for the long-term viability of the Alliance of American Football" and that the defendants "intended to conceal the fact that the league was insolvent." Instead, the suit claims the AAF projected it had funding for years. The suit also alleges the defendants "made promises to the plaintiffs and class members regarding the long-term longevity and health of the league. Defendants did not intend to perform the promises made when they made the promises."

The players' suit also alleges Schmidt and Northrup would not have played in the league if they knew it wasn't financially viable from the start.

The players are suing for damages and requesting each plaintiff and class-action member get three times the damages they endured, general damages and punitive damages.

Last month, Polian said during a conference call that Dundon's money gave the league "long-term" stability.

Roberson's suit alleges violations of the WARN Act (Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act of 1988), which states employees are "entitled to receive 60 days' advance written notice" in the event of a mass layoff. It also alleges that employees were not paid for the 60 days after the layoffs, including commissions, bonuses, holiday pay and vacation pay.

 

Roberson's suit is asking for the sum of "unpaid wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, accrued holiday pay, accrued vacation pay pension and 401(k) contributions and other ERISA [Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974] benefits that would have been covered and paid under the then applicable employee benefit plans had that coverage continued for that period, for sixty (60) working days following the terminations."

The suit also requests interest on those payments as well as "other and further relief" the court chooses to award.

The Roberson lawsuit was first reported by Courthouse News.

The AAF suspended football operations on April 2 and fired most of its employees. While still existing as an entity -- some league employees remain -- most employees lost their jobs on or soon after April 3.

The league and some of its executives, including Ebersol, were sued in February by venture capitalist Robert Vanech, alleging the league was his idea and Ebersol reneged on an agreement to work together to create the league.

 

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Developmental leagues don't work for the football the way they do for baseball, soccer, and hockey.

The NFL takes a much more severe toll on the body.  Players primes are 23-27 and, in many cases, players are already declining years before they even hit 30.  With the exception of QB, skills acquisition in football actually happens MUCH faster than it does in other sports (no offense, but it's true).  

Sure there can be rare exceptions to the rule, but other sports with successful developmental leagues actually use it as a key stepping stone for EVERYONE in their talent pipeline...not just for scrubs who have been passed by on the off chance that they catch lightning in a bottle.  In that regard, NCAA football IS the developmental league and there really is no room for another.

 

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6 hours ago, eagle45 said:

Developmental leagues don't work for the football the way they do for baseball, soccer, and hockey.

The NFL takes a much more severe toll on the body.  Players primes are 23-27 and, in many cases, players are already declining years before they even hit 30.  With the exception of QB, skills acquisition in football actually happens MUCH faster than it does in other sports (no offense, but it's true).  

The NFL wants a developmental league...basically to develop QBs...but there's little chance it could make money.  I'd kind of like to see them try a minor league that would play all it's games in the same city.

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