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Finalsts for the 2020 Hall of Fame Class

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Pro Football Hall of Fame Centennial Class revealed

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001096785/article/pro-football-hall-of-fame-centennial-class-revealed

The Pro Football Hall of Fame Centennial Class of 2020's remaining 13 inductees -- 10 seniors and three contributors -- are being revealed today on Good Morning Football live on NFL Network. They follow the previous announcements over the weekend of Bill Cowher and Jimmy Johnson. The 15 inductees will be joined by five modern-day selections announced the day before the Super Bowl during NFL Honors on Feb. 1.

Here are the members of the Pro Football Centennial Class of 2020:

Jim Covert, OT, 1983-1990 Chicago Bears

They called him "Jimbo," and in the shadow of one of the most famed defensive teams of all-time, Jim Covert was an offensive standout who paved the way for all-time great Walter Payton when the Bears won Super Bowl XX. A two-time All-Pro selection, Covert was the sixth overall pick in the 1983 NFL Draft, the No. 13 Bear of all-time in the franchise's top 100 list and a member of the NFL's 1980s All-Decade Team.

Winston Hill, OT, 1963-1976 New York Jets/1977 Los Angeles Rams

Protecting Joe Namath's backside autumn after autumn, Winston Hill was a four-time AFL All-Star and four-time Pro Bowl pick. The left tackle also earned three All-Pro nods during a decorated 15-season career that at one point boasted a string of 174 starts. The Texas native was a crucial cog in the Jets winning Super Bowl III.

Harold Carmichael, WR, 1971-1983 Philadelphia Eagles/1984 Dallas Cowboys

There are prototypical wide receivers and there is Harold Carmichael, a Philly favorite who boasted a 6-foot-8, 225-pound frame. A four-time Pro Bowler, three-time All-Pro and NFL 1970s All-Decade Team honoree, the big-bodied Eagle produced three 1,000-yard seasons and proved pivotal in Philadelphia advancing to its first Super Bowl in 1980. He ended his days with the Eagles as the career leader in every major receiving statistic and for his career had 590 catches for 8,985 yards and 79 touchdowns.

Duke Slater, OT, 1922 Milwaukee Badgers/1922-25 Rock Island Independents/1926-1931 Chicago Cardinals

A transformative and hugely important figure in the history of football, Duke Slater was the first African-American lineman in league chronicle. A standout on both sides of the ball, Slater was a multiple-time All-Pro.

Ed Sprinkle, DE/LB, 1944-1955 Chicago Bears

A two-way player at the onset of his NFL career, Ed Sprinkle's reputation truly grew and remained due to his defensive prowess. Known for his hard-charging ways and aggressive play, Sprinkle helped the Bears to a 1946 NFL Championship, was a four-time Pro Bowl pick and was a member of the 1940s All-Decade Team.

Steve Sabol, Administrator/President, 1964-2012 NFL Films

A memorable voice who told the tale of autumns past to NFL fans, Steve Sabol took over as the president of NFL Films in 1985 from his father Ed, who created the company. During his time with NFL Films, Steve Sabol won more than 40 Emmy Awards and oversaw 107 Emmy wins for NFL Films.

Alex Karras, DT, 1958-1962, 1964-1970 Detroit Lions

One of the NFL alumni's most famous faces on the big and small screen, Alex Karras was as destructive on the NFL field as he was noticeable in projects such as "Blazing Saddles" and the TV show "Webster." Through his career with the Lions, the 1958 first-round pick was a four-time Pro Bowl pick, a three-time All-Pro and an NFL 1960s All-Decade Team selection.

Bobby Dillon, S, 1952-1959 Green Bay Packers

A ball hawk in the Packers' defensive backfield for eight seasons, Bobby Dillon tallied 52 career interceptions during his days in Green Bay. He had an eye-popping nine picks in three individual seasons. For five straight years, Dillon was a Pro Bowler with three of those seasons accompanied by All-Pro accolades.

Donnie Shell, S, 1974-1987 Pittsburgh Steelers

The Steel Curtain defense was loaded with talented standouts and Donnie Shell was one of them. For 14 seasons, Shell patrolled the defensive backfield, winning four Super Bowls, nabbing five Pro Bowl selections and garnering 51 interceptions. Shell's interception total was the most all-time for a strong safety upon his retirement and is currently tied for 32nd.

George Young, Contributor/General Manager, 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League

One of the most respective NFL executives of his day, George Young aided mightily in the Giants winning two Super Bowls during his time as general manager from 1979-1997. Thereafter, he was the NFL's senior vice president of football operations from 1998-2001.

Cliff Harris, S, 1970-1979 Dallas Cowboys

Throughout the 1970s, Cliff Harris was a phenomenal constant in the defensive backfield for America's Team. Amazingly, Dallas made it to the postseason in nine of Harris' 10 seasons, including five Super Bowl appearances with two victories. A Pro Bowler in six straight seasons starting in 1974 and going through the final campaign of his career, Harris was a three-time All-Pro who tallied 29 interceptions and 18 fumble recoveries.

Mac Speedie, End, 1946-1952 Cleveland Browns

Bestowed with a fitting name for his future NFL prowess, Mac Speedie was a receiver before his time. Named to the NFL's 1940s All-Decade Team, the six-time All-Pro led the league in receptions on four occasions and twice was led in receiving yards. In 1947 and 1949, he surpassed the 1,000-yard receiving barrier.

Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner, 1989-2006 NFL

The NFL's leading man for parts of three decades, Paul Tagliabue led the league into the 21st century and oversaw its expansion from 28 to 32 teams. During his time, the Jacksonville Jaguars, Carolina Panthers, Houston Texans and reborn Cleveland Browns all came to be. He also navigated the NFL's expansion into Europe and helmed the league through the most arduous times such as the tragedies of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina.

 

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I'm glad to see Steve Sabol get in. He really was a great contributor and his (as well as his fathers) work at NFL Films helped the NFL become what it is today.

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Pearson will probably get in eventually but didn’t deserve it over Carmichael. Carmichael had 101 more receptions, 1163 more yards and 31 more TDs. 

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:lol:  "Drew Pearson Hall of Fame Announcement Posted by Drew Pearson Live" 

 

 

 

Bet he regrets that ASSumption. It's always best to stay humble and let good things come to you.

As it turned out, all of the men that made it, were told on Saturday. Of course, Pearson couldn't have known that, since he wasn't told anything on Saturday. He thought it would be a 'surprise' kind of thing this morning whereas Harold found out on Saturday and had to keep it a secret.

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5 hours ago, nipples said:

Pearson will probably get in eventually but didn’t deserve it over Carmichael. Carmichael had 101 more receptions, 1163 more yards and 31 more TDs. 

and Carmichael had to do it with the likes of Reaves, Boryla and an over the hill Gabriel throwing it to him. Pearson had Staubach and Danny White...two good QBs  (Staubach a HOF'er).

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It's too bad that Gonzalez went in last year, this would have been the perfect year for him to go in, like Dawk in 2018.

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I was looking at the list of Hall of Fame players broken down by franchise, earlier ( https://www.profootballhof.com/heroes-of-the-game/franchises/ ), and I was a bit surprised that a franchise as old as the Bengals only has 1 'major contributor' Hall of Fame player in the Hall. In all, they only have 3 total, on the list. But Anthony Muñoz is their only 'major contributor'. The Panthers also only have 3 total in the hall but with 0 'major contributors'.

The Texans and Jaguars also have 0 'major contributors' but while the Texans have Ed Reed as their sole Hall of Fame player, the Jaguars don't have any representation at all.

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3 hours ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

I was looking at the list of Hall of Fame players broken down by franchise, earlier ( https://www.profootballhof.com/heroes-of-the-game/franchises/ ), and I was a bit surprised that a franchise as old as the Bengals only has 1 'major contributor' Hall of Fame player in the Hall. In all, they only have 3 total, on the list. But Anthony Muñoz is their only 'major contributor'. The Panthers also only have 3 total in the hall but with 0 'major contributors'.

The Texans and Jaguars also have 0 'major contributors' but while the Texans have Ed Reed as their sole Hall of Fame player, the Jaguars don't have any representation at all.

Another sport, but there is no one in the National Baseball Hall of Fame who has played even one game for the Colorado Rockies.

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8 hours ago, xzmattzx said:

Another sport, but there is no one in the National Baseball Hall of Fame who has played even one game for the Colorado Rockies.

I think that ends today with Larry Walker. 

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11 hours ago, Dawkins 20 said:

I think that ends today with Larry Walker. 

Just looked it up, he was elected.

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22 minutes ago, VaBeach_Eagle said:

Just looked it up, he was elected.

He was! Glad to see him get in. 

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On ‎1‎/‎2‎/‎2020 at 7:59 PM, ShakeThatMonkey said:

Interested to see how John Lynch fares.

I wonder of the 49ers being in the Super Bowl will influence the voters to give him the nod. They'd never admit it, but it might.

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On 1/20/2020 at 7:44 PM, VaBeach_Eagle said:

I was looking at the list of Hall of Fame players broken down by franchise, earlier ( https://www.profootballhof.com/heroes-of-the-game/franchises/ ), and I was a bit surprised that a franchise as old as the Bengals only has 1 'major contributor' Hall of Fame player in the Hall. In all, they only have 3 total, on the list. But Anthony Muñoz is their only 'major contributor'.

Look at this Bengals 50th anniversary team:

https://www.cincyjungle.com/2017/7/25/16025412/cincinnati-bengals-announce-all-50th-team-50th-season

Anybody's name jump out to you?

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7 minutes ago, toolg said:

Look at this Bengals 50th anniversary team:

https://www.cincyjungle.com/2017/7/25/16025412/cincinnati-bengals-announce-all-50th-team-50th-season

Anybody's name jump out to you?

Multiple names jump out to me, because I remember a lot of them from their playing days. I remember Boomer from his days at Maryland as well as his pro career. I assume you're referring to Bergey, though?

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Deion Sanders is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame, but he thinks that club is adding too many members.

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Sanders said on the Dan Patrick Show that he believes there are too many players being allowed into the Hall of Fame, even if they weren’t truly great players, and it’s watering down the honor.

"What is a Hall of Famer now? Is it a guy who played a long time?” Sanders said. "It’s so skewed now. Once upon a time, a Hall of Famer was a player who changed the darn game, who made you want to reach in your pocket and pay your admission to see that guy play. That’s not a Hall of Famer anymore. Every Tom, D and Harry, you’re a Hall of Famer, you’re a Hall of Famer, you’re a Hall of Famer. They let everybody in this thing. It’s not exclusive anymore. And I don’t like it.”

Although Sanders didn’t want to name any specific players who he thinks have watered down the Hall of Fame, when Patrick asked him about Eli Manning, Sanders answered, "You get the point.”

Sanders added that he doesn’t think there should be a minimum number of new Hall of Famers each year. The Hall has enshrined at least six new members in every class since 2006, and Sanders thinks that’s too many.

"It should be based on, ‘Are you that guy?’ Not just because we have to meet a quota,” Sanders said.

Sanders’ comments may not make him popular among some of the Hall of Fame finalists hoping to get voted in on Saturday, but he sees the Hall of Fame as a club that ought to be more exclusive than it is.

 

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Polamalu, Atwater, James lead 2020 Hall of Fame class

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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001100210/article/polamalu-atwater-james-lead-2020-hall-of-fame-class

Just over two weeks after 15 footballing greats were announced as members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Centennial Class of 2020, the 20-person fraternity was rounded out by five modern-era nominees.

Steve Atwater, Isaac Bruce, Steve Hutchinson, Edgerrin James and Troy Polamalu will be enshrined in Canton, Ohio this summer, as announced Saturday night at NFL Honors. The enshrinees range in experience and patience; Polamalu got in in his first year of eligibility, while Atwater finally reached Canton in his 16th.

A hard-hitting safety with eight Pro Bowls to his name, Atwater was apparently a big hit with the Hall's selection committee this time around. Atwater entered the league as a first-round pick of Denver in 1989 and more than lived up to his billing. A member of the All-Rookie Team in '89, Atwater keyed the Broncos' run to the top of the conference and to his first of three Super Bowl appearances. Over the course of his 11-year career, Atwater delivered over 1,000 tackles, most of them memorable and devastating. The free safety logged multiple picks in all but three seasons and finished his career with 24 interceptions. Atwater was named first-team All-Pro twice, in 1991 and 1992, and helped Denver to Super Bowl titles in 1997 and 1998. Voted as a member of the 1990s All-Decade Team, Atwater's career will now be recalled for all-time in Canton.

The Greatest Show on Turf would have been just another offense without Bruce. The wideout followed the Rams from Los Angeles to St. Louis and led them into the spotlight around the turn of the century. A second-round selection in 1994, Bruce broke out in 1995 with a 13-touchdown campaign and a career-high 1,781 receiving yards. The following season, he led the league with 1,338 receiving yards. But Bruce wouldn't leave his most lasting marks until Kurt Warner took over for Trent Green under center in 1999. Along with Torry Holt and Marshall Faulk, Bruce keyed a Rams offense that burned through the opposition in '99 on its way to Super Bowl XXXIV. Though Warner took home Super Bowl MVP honors, Bruce logged the game-winning score, a 73-yard catch-and-run TD that put St. Louis up for good and delivered the Rams their only Super Bowl title. Bruce was never named first-team All-Pro but was voted to four Pro Bowls over his career. When he retired in 2010, Bruce was the Rams' all-time leader in receptions, receiving yards and yards from scrimmage, and his 15,209 receiving yards were the second-most all-time.

A stalwart in Seattle, Minnesota and Tennessee, Hutchinson was one of the most reliable offensive linemen of his era. A member of the All-Rookie team after being selected by Seattle in the first round of the 2001 draft, the guard paved the way for three consecutive Seahawks playoff appearances and Shaun Alexander's 2005 MVP season. Hutchinson started at guard in Seattle's defeat in Super Bowl XL, only to sign a massive deal with Minnesota in free agency the following season. In Minneapolis, it was more of the same. Hutchinson cleared alleys for Adrian Peterson and led the Vikings to the cusp of a Super Bowl appearance in 2009. A member of the All-Decade Team of the 2000s, the offensive lineman was also voted to seven Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro five times before retiring after the 2012 season.

Peyton Manning's backfield mate for seven seasons in Indianapolis, James was the engine behind the Colts' excellent early-aughts offenses. Drafted fourth overall in 1999, James broke out right away, securing rushing titles in his first two seasons (1,553 and a career-best 1,709 yards) and winning Rookie of the Year and earning first-team All-Pro honors in '99. Complemented by Manning, Marvin Harrison and Reggie Wayne, the running back helped Indy to four division titles and an AFC title game. Though he missed reaching the Super Bowl with Indy, James made it to the big game with the Cardinals in 2008. James topped 1,000 yards seven times and 1,500 on four occasions over his 11-year career. The tailback was also voted to four Pro Bowls and named to the 2000s All-Decade Team.

Arguably the preeminent safety of his generation, Polamalu reached the Hall by more than a hair -- though he had plenty to go around. The Steelers strong safety had a preternatural sense for the ball and was known for his tenacious tackling at the line of scrimmage. With Polamalu in the defensive backfield for 12 seasons, Pittsburgh made seven playoff appearances, won five AFC North titles and reached three Super Bowls. Polamalu's unforgettable pick-six in the 2008 AFC title game propelled Pittsburgh to Super Bowl XLIII, where the Steelers snagged their NFL-record sixth Lombardi Trophy. Two years later, Polamalu took home 2010 AP Defensive Player of the Year honors after logging seven interceptions. A member of the 2000s All-Decade Team, Polamalu was voted to eight Pro Bowls and was named first-team All-Pro four times. In his first year of eligibility, Polamalu earned the highest honor of them all.

 

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Looking ahead 12 months, there's only 4 open spots for 'modern era' players... as opposed to the 5 actual spots that 'modern' era players have available. Why only 4? Because one of those 4 spots is already guaranteed to go to Peyton Manning.

Who gets the other 4? 2021 will be Michael Vick's first year of eligibility. Personally, I don't believe he had a Hall of Fame worthy career. I think McNabb had a better career than Vick, and I don't believe he had a "Hall worthy" career.

 

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1 hour ago, xzmattzx said:

Do they have to pick 5? Or can it be less?

5 isn't a requirement, it's just the maximum allowable.

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Still baffles me why randy gradishar is not in the hof

all pro 6 times

7 pro bowls

dpoy

sb appearance

 

 

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How was Tom Flores leapfrogged by Bill Cowher, Jimmy Johnson for Hall of Fame?

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https://www.espn.com/blog/oakland-raiders/post/_/id/24062/how-was-tom-flores-leapfrogged-by-bill-cowher-jimmy-johnson-for-hall-of-fame

ALAMEDA, Calif. -- A dual twinge of nostalgia and, well, disappointment was in the air as former Raiders quarterback and coach Tom Flores played host to a small Super Bowl party at his home in the Palm Desert, California, area Feb. 2.

After all, Flores was pulling for one of his former teams in the Kansas City Chiefs -- "Hey, I won my first ring with them," he said, referencing his time on the Chiefs' Super Bowl IV title team -- and he was still "kind of disgusted” by the manner in which he was snubbed, again, by the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Especially since Flores had been in Miami that week and was presented with the Hispanic Lifetime Achievement Award in the Salute to Hispanics in Sports and Entertainment ceremony. Others honored that day included musician and producer Emilio Estefan (Most Influential Hispanic of the Decade) and New York Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman (Hispanic Athlete of the Year).

Because Flores, who turns 83 on March 21, said he was told by Hall president David Baker that he would be "almost a shoo-in" on the new Blue Ribbon committee that earmarked spots for two coaches. After being a finalist in regular ballot voting in 2019, Flores had accepted the invitation thinking he already would be in South Florida being presented as a Hall of Famer as part of the league's special 20-man Centennial Class.

Instead, Flores, along with legions of supporters, watched in disbelief and dismay three weeks prior to the Super Bowl, as first Bill Cowher -- "I turned to my wife and said, 'I'm bounced, I'm out,'" Flores recalled -- and then Jimmy Johnson were welcomed to Canton, Ohio, by Baker on their respective CBS and Fox pregame shows in made-for-TV moments.

How does a guy who not only won two rings as the first minority head coach to win a Super Bowl but was a finalist the year before on the much-tougher-to-crack regular ballot get leapfrogged by not one but two guys who were never really in the national conversation?

In speaking with multiple sources with knowledge of what occurred in the room where the 25-member Blue Ribbon committee made its secret-ballot selections on Jan. 8, a few factors were at play.

For one, the makeup of the special committee sapped momentum Flores had a year earlier because only 13 of the 25 panel members were regular Hall selectors. The other 12 were an assortment of coaches, executives and Hall of Famers such as Bill Belichick, D LeBeau, Ozzie Newsome, Carl Peterson and Bill Polian.

"There was a different dynamic in that room," one source said, talking about the 12 newcomers having little to no context of previous discussions. Also, another source said when the finalists were whittled down from 15 to 10 in 2019, selectors were told that a special category for coaches would be set up in 2020, the inference being that cutting Flores and Don Coryell at that stage would be easier to digest since they would be up for consideration a year later.

For another, Flores, on the coaches ballot, and the late Cliff Branch, on the seniors ballot, had issues with their representation when their names came up for discussion.

Frank Cooney of the Sports Xchange, who reps the Raiders when they have finalists, was ill and unable to make the trip to Canton for the meeting. While Branch's case was taken up by former Raiders executive Ron Wolf, a Hall of Famer in his own right, Flores was represented by former ESPN NFL Insider John Clayton, a huge advocate of Flores who also, as luck would have it, presented both Coryell and Cowher.

Raiders Hall of Fame coach John Madden, a member of the Blue Ribbon panel, did not fly to Canton, either. Rather, he listened in on a conference call (as did Cooney) and, sources said, had trouble with his phone connection and did not weigh in much, if at all, for Flores or Branch.

Lastly, and as strange as it might sound, the committee might be suffering from what a source said was "Raider fatigue," with Ray Guy, Wolf, Tim Brown and Ken Stabler all gaining induction since 2014, and Charles Woodson eligible next year.

"I don't know," Flores said. "It happened. What can I do about it? I don't have a choice. My fans are still my fans -- they're still going to make a lot of noise. A lot of people are really pissed off about this whole thing. A lot of people are pissed off for other guys that didn't make it, either. I can't say I'm exclusive in that respect."

True. Video of a visibly upset Drew Pearson at his own watch party went viral. And Raiders fans felt a double whammy with Branch also being passed over, despite career accolades and rings dwarfing those of Harold Carmichael, who got in.

Branch's sister, Elaine Anderson, told ESPN.com she planned to have a joint Hall of Fame party for her late brother and Flores.

"Clifford loved Tom Flores and Tom Flores had been pushing Clifford's name for the Hall of Fame," Anderson said before the class was announced. "It saddens me that [Flores] was overlooked."

On Jan. 30, a pair of United States congressmen, Rep. Jim Costa, D-Calif., and Rep. Darren Soto, D-Fla., introduced a resolution urging Flores be inducted into Canton.

A year after waiting as a Hall finalist in an Atlanta hotel room for a knock that never came, Flores was "hurt" by the lack of a phone call this time around. One that would have told him not this time, not this year. Instead, he watched on TV as Cowher and Johnson were feted, announcements that also stunned veteran selectors, sources said.

But there might be hope on the horizon. As mentioned, the Hall is contemplating adding a separate category just for coaches this summer, as it did for seniors and contributors, according to a source.

"If it happens, it's a matter of next year or a few years for Tom," the source said, adding that Mike Holmgren might be Flores' biggest competition going forward. "It's inevitable."

Until then, Flores, the first in league history to win Super Bowl rings as a player, an assistant and head coach (later joined by Hall of Famer Mike Ditka), is content to play host to small gatherings on Super Bowl Sunday.

Like he did on Feb. 2, while rocking a familiar red piece of clothing.

"I wore the jersey I had on 50 years ago," he said with a laugh. "And it fit. How about that?"

 

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Ok  if gale sayers and Terrell Davis are in due to shorten careers.    Then sterling sharpe should be in

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